Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Marie Kinsella-White from McDonald's to give some advice for people considering this job:

Marie Kinsella-White

Operations Consultant

McDonald's

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Marie Kinsella-White
The job that I do is highly specialised and the skills that I am required to have to do my job can only be acquired in our restaurant. However, by taking a job in McDonald's you are opening a career path to use those skills anywhere - the skills you acquire are very transferable. It doesn’t matter where you start, the opportunities are there.
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Creative?
Creative
Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Jobs in Demand


The Labour Market is constantly changing, with certain career sectors growing and others declining according to local and global change.

Currently, companies in Ireland are having difficulty in recruiting people with particular skills and experience, and labour market predictions indicate that some of these areas will continue to be a concern for employers over the next few years.

The Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN) publish a list anually, of what occupations and roles are experiencing skills shortages, and make recommendations for colleges and educators to alter their programmes to facilitate the ongoing changes.

This is good news for people looking for employment or a career change - it means that they can upskill or retrain themselves to be qualified for the jobs in demand, with a better than average chance of finding employment in their chosen area.

Explore the current list of Jobs in Demand