Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked David Fleming from Defence Forces to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

David Fleming

Sub Lieutenant - Navy

Defence Forces

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  David Fleming
Learn about the Naval Service – look at the website, visit a ship alongside a port when they are open to the public, talk to any friends/family in the Naval Service, ring the Recruiting Office.
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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Adult Learner

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Adult Learners


Every year, thousands of Adult Learners, ranging from early school leavers to people with a disability, to jobseekersdecide to go back to education on a part-time or full-time basis.

The reasons people decide to return to learning are wide and varied too:

  • Maybe you want to improve your job prospects?
  • Perhaps you are exploring a career change?
  • You may want to update your skills (information technology has transformed the workplace and we all need to constantly upskill to keep up-to-date)
  • You might simply want to learn for fun?
Whatever the reason, there are lots of opportunities out there for adult learners.

Going back to study as an adult can be daunting, particularly if you had a negative experience of formal education. The good news is that, as an adult learner, you decide what education and training options best suit you. Adult learning options are wide and varied and they are designed to be enjoyable, relevant to your interests, flexible and to fit in with work and family life.

When considering to further your education, consider whether you want your course to lead to a recognised award or not. Many adults simply want to learn about an area that interests them, and are not concerned with qualifications. On the other hand, if your course promises a recognised award, it is important to know who accredits it - otherwise you may not be able to use it for getting a job, or continuing your education further.

Click here to explore awarding bodies with the authority to accredit courses

Follow the links on this page to find courses that suit you, and explore a range of supports that may help you on your way.

  Hint: Sustainable Energy Authority

Yes, it is very important to continue with upskilling throughout your career. In the last few years I have started to learn and use new-found skills based aroung lean six sigma principles.

Throughout my career I have been fortunate to take a number of specialised training courses that have benfitted both the company and I.

Energy Management Pumping systems, Time Management, Intensive French, Health and Safety, Remote Emergency Care, Lean Six Sigma (Green and Black Belt), to name only a few.

I would like to go on to do an MBA in the future when kids leave home and I have more time available to study.


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