Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Elaine McGarrigle from CRH plc to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Elaine McGarrigle

Mechanical Engineer

CRH plc

Read more

  Elaine McGarrigle

The most important skill that a person in my position can have is communication.

One needs to be able to communicate effectively with people of all levels in order to do a days work. I think that this is the most important quality, to be able to fit in well with people, everyone from the operators to the senior management, one needs to be able to read them and how best to communicate with them.

An interest in basic engineering and in the heavy machine industry.

It is important to realise that working as a mechanical engineer in Irish Cement does not generally involve sitting at your desk all day. It involves alot of hands on, on-site work so a person needs to be prepared to get their hands dirty.

Another quality that is important is to be willing to learn. Even after a number of years in college, one needs to be eager to learn the ins and outs of a new environment; how cement is made, what equipment is involved, what generally goes wrong and how it is fixed.

Everyone will help and teach you but you need to open your mind and be prepared to take it all in.

Close

Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
Career Interviews
Sector Profiles
School Subjects (LC)
College Courses
Close
Study Skills
Other
Work Experience (School)
CV & Interview Preparation

Adult Learner

logo imagelogo image

Adult Guidance Services


Many people are unsure of where they should start when thinking about returning to education for personal development, to upskill or to get a job. There are services and supports available to help you with making these decisions:

Adult Educational Guidance Initiative

The Adult Education Guidance Service in Ireland is available to adults who are thinking about returning to education.

Guidance Counsellors and Co-ordinators provide guidance to those participating or thinking about adult education programmes such as Vocational Training Opportunity Scheme (VTOS), Adult Literacy Programmes, Community Education, including Back to Education Initiative (BTEI).

Information officers within the AEGS can also provide advice and information on local, regional an national opportunities for adult learners.

Adult Education Guidance Services in the Leinster region
Adult Education Guidance Services in the Munster region
Adult Education Guidance Services in the Connaght region
Adult Education Guidance Services in the Ulster region

CareersPortal Career Guidance Service

What is Guidance?

“Guidance facilitates people throughout their lives to manage their own educational, training, occupational, personal, social and life choices so that they reach their full potential and contribute to the development of a better society.” (National Guidance Forum Report 2007)

CareersPortal provides a professional guidance counselling service for students and adults who would like support in making career, educational and/or employment decisions.

This service is of particular benefit to career changers, jobseekers, students and those looking to explore their career and education options.

To book an appointment contact Bernadette Walsh at bwalsh@careersportal.ie or phone: 01-2090797. All guidance counsellors are fully qualified professionals and members of the Institute of Guidance Counsellors.

Note: This is a fee paying appointment service. We cannot provide individual guidance advice by telephone.

Insitute of Guidance Counsellors

The Institute of Guidance Counsellors (IGC) is the professional body representing over 1200 guidance practitioners in second level schools, third level colleges, adult guidance services, private practice and in other settings. 

There are trained guidance professionals available that can help support you with your career planning and decisions. 

Go to the IGC WebsiteFor a list of registered private practitioners with the IGC click here.

Department of Social Protection

If you are currently unemployed, there may also be supports available when making employment and education decisions.

The Department of Social Protection have a number of key employment support services that provide information and advice for individuals in receipt of social welfare.

Contact information for all organisations and services that provide information and guidance to jobseekers is available here.
  Hint: Failte Ireland
On the practical skills side I still have to do my Mountain Leader Assessment.  I would also like to gain more kayak and canoeing qualifications and maybe an industrial "working at height" qualification, but I would also like to improve the soft skill side of the job role and do a course in facilitation.
Who said this?
Find out here:
go