Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Deborah Caffrey from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Deborah Caffrey

Electronic Engineer

Intel

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  Deborah Caffrey
For my particular job role, as a yield analysis engineer, good organization and communication skills are quite important. Along with having the technical knowledge, being able to properly communicate your ideas/findings is very important. A lot of my day is spent dealing with other people in the factory and it is very important to be able to communicate efficiently with them.
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Investigative?
Investigative 
The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Ruairí O’Kane - Research Scientist

Ruairí O’Kane is a research scientist who devises ways to stick phones, laptops, cars and even planes together. He helps to design adhesives and sealants (glue basically) for electronics, cars and other equipment.

He is a group leader at the Henkel facility in Tallaght, Dublin, a German adhesive technologies company. He joined Henkel in 2006 after completing his degree in chemistry in Trinity College Dublin and PhD in nanotechnology at the University of Liverpool.

He recently spent two years in Düsseldorf, Germany, at Henkel headquarters, returning to Dublin last year. Ruairí also completed a management degree at the Institute of Technology, Tallaght, while working at Henkel.

Why do we need new ways to stick things together?

Mobile phones need an adhesive to glue glass on to the frame or laptops need the screens stuck on. Different adhesives are needed to hold different components in place or you might need a sealant to keep water out of an electronic device. Making things lighter is also a big deal in aerospace and with cars. Every screw you remove from a car will make it a bit lighter and a bit more fuel efficient.

Why did you choose science and focus on chemistry?

Chemical structures and the illustrations of molecules and atomic orbitals in books at school fascinated me. The idea of designing and creating new molecules or processes to make new molecules really appealed to me. There is a nice combination in chemistry of theory and experiment.

What might you do during a typical day?

There isn’t really a typical day. My group usually would be working on three or four projects at a time. I would keep an eye that we are hitting our targets, and we discuss our challenges and how we are doing. What gives you the biggest thrill from your job? Generating new intellectual property and coming up with something that nobody else has done. Business units such as automotive and aerospace have an interest in our acrylic adhesive projects [superglues are acrylic adhesives].

We are working on a new adhesive for handheld devices. What subjects did you do in school?

I did A-levels [at St Patrick’s College, Maghera, Co Derry] in maths, chemistry and biology. I also did German to GCSE level and I built on that in Düsseldorf. Being able to communicate well is a big advantage because you are not always in the lab.

What are the perks of working in science?

We have specific milestones, but it is up to you what direction you take. What we are doing is constantly changing.


Article by: Smart Futures