Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Kieran Magee from Teagasc to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Kieran Magee

Farm Manager - Dry Stock

Teagasc

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  Kieran Magee
Someone who wants to be where I am today shall need bucket loads of ambition and not be afraid of hard work.  They will need to not be afraid of starting at the very bottom of that big high ladder but at the same time have the eagerness and determination to get to the top of that ladder because the opportunities are there.

Education is very important.  It may only seem like a silly piece of paper but it's that Cert, Diploma or Degree that gets you that job and not the man/woman beside you.

The one thing that is vital in not alone this job, but any job, and alot of people don't seem to have it, is common sense. It's something so simple but really important. if you have no cop-on then nobody wants to know you.
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Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Michael Keogh - Aircraft Engineer

Michael Keogh tells Smart Futures about working as a Ryanair aircraft engineer.

Describe your typical day?

I am a B2 avionics maintenance engineer so I work on electrical, instruments and radio systems. B1 engineers work on airframe and engine systems. We work 12-hour days, working two days then two nights, followed by four days off. On a typical day, I carry out a technical status review of our operating aircraft, plan for scheduled maintenance and provide technical support for our operating aircraft in Dublin and abroad. On nights, we carry out routine and scheduled maintenance.

What’s cool about your job?

Every day is different; there are always new challenges. I get great job satisfaction when I have to recover an aircraft with a technical issue that prevents it from flying, especially when abroad. To recover an aircraft, we have to find the cause, repair or remove and install a component, followed by a complete test of the affected system.

What are the main challenges?

Working in a high-pressure environment and maintaining our aircraft in a safe, efficient and cost-effective manner. I must keep up to date with my Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) licence, company approval and recurrent training. Another challenge is learning about new aircraft and systems in a constantly changing industry.

How do you get an IAA licence?

After completing an apprenticeship and on-the-job training, you can apply to do IAA exams. Once completed, the IAA issues a licence.

What advice would you give to someone considering this job?

Engineering and science subjects are extremely important as they help you to understand aircraft systems such as aerodynamics, pneumatic, hydraulics, jet propulsion, radio theory, electrical theory and instrumentation.

What subjects did you take in school?

I took maths, English, Irish, engineering, technical drawing, physics and French. The science and engineering subjects were essential during my apprenticeship and I use them every day in work.

What did you do after school?

I did an apprenticeship in aeronautical engineering with Ryanair in conjunction with FÁS in Shannon and Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT). During my apprenticeship I did night classes in radio, instruments and electrical theory.

What inspired your interest in engineering?

Having a curious mind; I always loved the practical side of technical drawing, metalwork and physics.

Article by: Smart Futures