Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Jason Ruane from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

Jason Ruane

Computer Programmer

Intel

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Jason Ruane

Possibly useful qualities/interests:

A predisposition towards technical problems, such as puzzles or machinery. An interest in the nature of how things work, such as the desire to disassemble machinery/gadgetry to unlock its inner workings.

An inventive side; one who uses the parts of other gadgets, to make a new personalised gadget. Interested in high tech gear: gadgetry of all forms.

A capacity to learn processes for oneself e.g. seeing a puzzle solved and then repeating it.

Skills: Technical subjects such as Maths or electronics. Programming is very accessible to anyone with a basic home PC and some internet connection so try it out and see if you like it.

Values: If you value the solving of an intricate, convoluted problem, for it's own sake and find that rewarding, then any engineering job will come easily.

Education: Firm basis in Maths and the sciences. People are hired into engineering positions here from backgrounds such as science and computing primarily.

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Investigative?
Investigative
The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Niall Moyna - Sports Scientist

“I have an amazing job. In fact, my job is my hobby,” says Niall Moyna, a top sports scientist at Dublin City University (DCU).

Niall came to science late, however. In secondary school, at St Macartan’s College in Monaghan, he was a runner and Gaelic footballer.

The fascination begins

“To make myself a better athlete, I would buy textbooks to figure out how the body worked and it was from there I just became fascinated with the body,” he explains.

At 17 he went to St Vincent’s hospital in Dublin to see a heart expert because of a suspected enlarged heart. It turned out he just had a large but healthy heart from running. It was then he realised he wanted to study and work in exercise and health.

Exciting discoveries

Niall did sports science at the University of Limerick and then did a master’s degree in Purdue University in Indiana, US. He was driven by his love of sport and still gets excited by discoveries.

“We have just completed a study where we looked at Gaelic football players and compared two groups,” says Niall. Both groups trained three times a week for six weeks. One group did standard training for 800 minutes in total. The other group did 80 minutes of high-intensity exercises (such as sprinting) three times a week. Those doing high-intensity training maintained their speed and power – unlike the others – and showed the same improvement in fitness.

“This is a great example of how we can maximise training for club-level Gaelic football players.”

Change of direction

When Niall came home from the US, he taught in the Marist College in Dundalk and St Macartan’s for three years. Then he returned to college, attending one of the biggest medical centres in the US at the University of Pittsburgh. He learned that the hardening of the arteries was an inflammatory response and realised that exercise could be used like a drug.

“I started to work with individuals with chronic clinical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer.”

A passion for research

Today he teaches and does research. He talks excitedly about studies in DCU on how exercise turns genes on and off and what kind of nutrition someone should take. There is an impression that you have to be a genius to be a scientist. “That is not the case. There are careers in science for a wide variety of people,” says Niall.


Article by: Smart Futures