Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Tracey Roche from Analog Devices to give some advice for people considering this job:

Tracey Roche

Design Engineer

Analog Devices

Read more

Tracey Roche

3 main things:

1. Be organised.

2. Try to keep a positive attitude.

3. Persevere. Working in a Design Evaluation role or indeed any electronic engineering role, requires problem-solving skills and half the battle with this is having a positive attitude. If you have a negative/pessimistic attitude, the battle to find a solution is lost before you even start. In debugging an issue, start with the basics and work from there. Like peeling an onion, gradually peel off the outter layers to reveal the inner core of the onion...as you work, you get more clues and develop a better understanding of the product/issue you are working on.

Close

Realist?
Realist
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
Career Interviews
Sector Profiles
School Subjects (LC)
College Courses
Close
Study Skills
Other
Work Experience (School)
CV & Interview Preparation

Featured Article

logo imagelogo image

Return to List



Dr Thomať Kakouli-Duarte - Biosciences Lecturer

Dr Thomaé Kakouli-Duarte is a lecturer in biosciences at the Institute of Technology, Carlow (ITC). She talked to Smart Futures about her career path so far.

What type of scientist are you?

I work in environmental research and focus on microscopic creatures called nematodes that live in the soil. We use nematodes as indicators of environmental change on soil health. They are also used as biological control agents. We also look at the genetic conservation of the bumblebee because bumblebee populations have major problems.

What are your main tasks?

I teach a number of modules at undergraduate level, including molecular genetics and immunology, cell biology, and ecology. I also supervise postgraduate students at masters and PhD level.

What’s a typical day?

Most of my day involves teaching undergraduates or seeing how the postgraduates are getting on with their research.

What is most interesting about your job?

Interacting with students and seeing them doing well is the best thing. The fulfilment you get from watching students progressing is unbelievable. I also really enjoy learning new things.

What are the main challenges?

To complete a PhD is not only a big challenge for the students but also for me, the supervisor. It’s a stamina race for the students and for us.

What subjects did you take in school?

Maths is very important for many scientific disciplines so I did it at higher level. I also took physics, chemistry and biology.

What courses or training did you do after school?

My first degree was a branch of agriculture called crop production. That was in Greece as I’m Greek by birth. Then I did an MSc in crop protection in the UK. I stayed in the University of Reading and did my PhD in biological control using nematodes.

After my PhD, I found a job for 10 months in molecular genetics in NUI Maynooth. That was a new discipline for me. Another contract appeared in Maynooth after this and I was there for three years. You can start somewhere in your career but you can take steps to diversify.

What advice would you give to someone considering this job?

Hard work pays. You just have to wait, be patient, focus and have long-term plans. Break these into smaller bits and do one thing at a time, but have a big target.

What inspires your love of science and the environment?

My father was a forester and he used to take me out to look at plants, animals and bugs. I think it’s a miracle the way our planet functions. Now that our planet is in need of protection, this drives me to do something about it.

Article by: Smart Futures