Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Jason Ruane from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

Jason Ruane

Computer Programmer

Intel

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Jason Ruane

Possibly useful qualities/interests:

A predisposition towards technical problems, such as puzzles or machinery. An interest in the nature of how things work, such as the desire to disassemble machinery/gadgetry to unlock its inner workings.

An inventive side; one who uses the parts of other gadgets, to make a new personalised gadget. Interested in high tech gear: gadgetry of all forms.

A capacity to learn processes for oneself e.g. seeing a puzzle solved and then repeating it.

Skills: Technical subjects such as Maths or electronics. Programming is very accessible to anyone with a basic home PC and some internet connection so try it out and see if you like it.

Values: If you value the solving of an intricate, convoluted problem, for it's own sake and find that rewarding, then any engineering job will come easily.

Education: Firm basis in Maths and the sciences. People are hired into engineering positions here from backgrounds such as science and computing primarily.

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Naturalist
Not surprisingly, some aspect of the natural sciences will run through the Naturalists interests - from ecological awareness to nutrition and health. People with an interest in horticulture, land usage and farming (including fish) are Naturalists.

Some Naturalists focus on animals rather than plants, and may enjoy working with, training, caring for, or simply herding them. Other Naturalists will prefer working with the end result of nature's produce - the food produced from plants and animals. Naturalists like solving problems with solutions that show some sensitivity to the environmental impact of what they do. They like to see practical results, and prefer action to talking and discussing.
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Adrian Collins - Physics Researcher

What were the main ‘career decision’ milestones in your life so far?

My background in applied physics and instrumentation really defined the rest of my career. A degree in physics not only teaches you about physics, but also teaches you about critical thinking and problem solving. Those formative years learning physics and how real science is performed has undoubtedly shaped the rest of my career.

Who are the people who most influenced your career direction?

Typically I’ll say my parents have been my biggest influence. Not in a direct way, but more in a supportive way to allow me to find what I’m interested in.

Does your job allow you to have a lifestyle you are happy with?

Yes. A work -life balance is very important. I’m a very sporty person so my work needs to allow me to pursue that too, which thankfully it does!

How did you go about getting your current job?

I don’t believe in luck, I believe that hard work will give you certain opportunities and it’s up to you to take them. I got to my current position by being in the right place at the right time. Getting to that right place is all about hard work.

Describe a typical day?

My current position is a mixture of research and the development of education materials for teaching science. So I really don’t have a typical day. I work on various projects at the same time. Each project requires lots of work and lots of meetings so each day is a new and interesting experience.

What are the main tasks and responsibilities?

Research is my main passion. This requires careful development of experiments, designing equipment, carrying out experiments, data analysis and most importantly documentation. Every researcher is responsible for each step in the process.

What are the main challenges?

Funding is always a major challenge. Trying to figure out to how fund your research is a difficult but necessary part of my job.

What’s cool?

Some of the coolest parts of my job include figuring stuff out, large data sets, stuff not making sense and eventually solving a problem and making your project or research work.

What particular skills do you bring to your workplace?

Problem solving and analytical thinking are two of my main skills that I bring to the workplace.

What subjects did you take in school and how have these influenced your career path?

Physics, engineering, maths and English have probably been most influential in my career. English may seem out of place, but effective communication is vitally important for an effective researcher. It’s great to be able to figure out some cool new technology, but without the ability to tell others effectively, your discovery is very limited.

What is your education to date?

An honours Bachelor of Science in Computerised Instrument Systems and a Ph.D. in Applied Physics and Instrumentation is my education to date.

What aspects of your education have proven most important for your job?

Problem solving, critical thinking and effective communications are the key aspects of my education that have proven the most important for my job.

What have been the most rewarding events in your career so far?

Publishing peer reviewed papers is key for any researcher. They act as a milestone for your research as well as a vital moment where you can share your work. These moments are the most rewarding of my career to date.

What personal qualities do you have that helps you in your career?

Having a cool head, being an analytical thinker and having an inherent interest in how stuff works helps greatly in my career.

What advice would you give to someone considering this job?

I think for any job it’s important to talk to the people who are actually working in the field.

What are the three most important personal characteristics required for the job?

Perseverance, interest, and enthusiasm are the most important characteristics required for the job.

Article by: Smart Futures