Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Damien Mason from CRH plc to give some advice for people considering this job:

Damien Mason

Mechanical Engineer

CRH plc

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Damien Mason

If you are really interested in people and have good interpersonal skills, you will find this job very rewarding.

Like a lot of jobs, you will not be using all the theoretical knowledge you gained in University or College, but you will develop significant management potential and the environment is stimulating and rewarding.

As an engineer, you will probably spend about 50% of your time in the office, and the other 50% out in the plant.

You should also expect that you may be asked if you are willing to travel abroad. This would be very attractive to most people, and a definite means to gain great experience, but it may not suit everyone.

You should ideally be a balanced person, someone with a good deal of technical knowledge, but also a good ability to deal with people.

Responsibility and challenges will be given to you from day one, and if you can handle the pressure, you will gain more and more responsibilities, ultimately leading you to gain invaluable experience, and undoubtedly onto a successful management position.

With the global nature of ICL's parent company CRH, this could be yours in Ireland or one of many countries worldwide.

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Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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A Day in the Life of a Trade Union Worker

The work in a Trade Union is often varied and never dull. Work in this kind of area is interchangeable and can range from Industrial Relation matters to collusion with the Government in promoting the interests of their members for social development and justice.

The work of a union is on behalf of their members and is achieved through various management structures. Whether it’s at Head Office or committee level, each group share a common thread in seeking justice and promoting the interests of the members.

A daily routine always starts with calls from members who find themselves in difficulties or just need advice on smaller grievances. The main focus of the work lies in industrial relations. This can begin with a problem such as conditions of work or more frequently a lack of standards in the workplace.

The method used in dealing with calls is adopting a standard structure through various mechanisms whether it’s Union Agreements or Government Circulars.

The various problems that members bring to our attention include contractual and disciplinary problems, grievance & complaint procedures, pay, retirement & pension queries, maternity, paternity & sick leave queries, equality policies and the development and formation of policies, health & safety queries and managerial structures.

The mechanisms developed in dealing with these concerns are on first point of contact the interception of union officials at ground level and subsequently at management level if needs be. Where the need exists to resolve them further a case may be taken to an Adjudicator, Conciliation Service, the Rights Commissioner Service or the Employment Appeals Tribunal at the Labour Relations Commission.

At all stages the Union will represent their members to the best of their ability in search of social justice and legal equality.



Article by: LawEd