Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Afra Ronayne from ESB to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Afra Ronayne

Mechanical Engineer

ESB

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  Afra Ronayne
I would advise somebody considering this job to talk to people who are engineers already. They should try to talk to people working in different areas of engineering as even when people do the same degree they can have very different day to day jobs, from full time office based jobs to full time site based jobs.

Also it is important to remember that even if you complete an engineering degree you are not limited to a purely technical career as there are plenty of other areas you can get involved in like project management or finance.
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A Career in Cyber Security

"Only 1 in 10 cyber security professionals are women. But if you're interested don't let this put you off."

Responsible for reducing the risk from a cyber attack, cyber security jobs make an important contribution to today's society as we become increasingly more reliant on the internet and IT systems.

The 2015 Global Information Security Workforce Study predicts that the global cyber security workforce shortage will reach 1.5 million within five years as demand outstrips supply. This means that there hasn't been a better time to join the cyber security sector.

Are cyber security jobs interesting?

Most companies now use the internet to do business, to advertise and sell, find new markets, communicate with customers and suppliers, and carry out financial transactions. The internet brings huge business opportunities and benefits. But it also brings risks. Every day there are attacks on the IT systems of UK companies and you can be involved in defending against that.

Amanda Finch, general manager at the Institute of Information Security Professionals (IISP), says the interesting challenge of working in cyber security is, 'to look at the changing threat landscape, changes in technology and working practices and be able to interpret how this will affect the organisation.'

Who's in demand?

People who can understand risk, investigate incidents, communicate solutions and are not afraid to learn new skills.

Only 1 in 10 cyber security professionals are women. But if you're interested don't let this put you off. Cyber security is a challenging and fast-moving career for all and if cyber security is a man's world, then why do women continue to succeed just as impressively as men? Historically, women have demonstrated that they have the skills needed to excel in cyber security. The Bletchley Park codebreaking operation during World War 2 was made up of nearly 10,000 people and about 75% of these were women.

Today, of course, women do occupy senior roles within cyber security including that of chief information security officer (CISO). The CISO has overall responsibility for making sure the digital information infrastructure of an organisation is secure. They create and manage a team of security professionals who enforce the right security protocols for the business around everything from handling data to protecting the systems and processes the organisation relies on.

'Lifelong learning is the key. Having a yearning for learning will help you keep up to date with the changes in this area. But also articulate what you can do in a competency based way,' explains Andrea Simmons, chief information security officer at HP Enterprise Services and director of the IISP.

Read original article here.

Article by: HM Government, June 2015