Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Jason Ruane from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

Jason Ruane

Computer Programmer

Intel

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Jason Ruane

Possibly useful qualities/interests:

A predisposition towards technical problems, such as puzzles or machinery. An interest in the nature of how things work, such as the desire to disassemble machinery/gadgetry to unlock its inner workings.

An inventive side; one who uses the parts of other gadgets, to make a new personalised gadget. Interested in high tech gear: gadgetry of all forms.

A capacity to learn processes for oneself e.g. seeing a puzzle solved and then repeating it.

Skills: Technical subjects such as Maths or electronics. Programming is very accessible to anyone with a basic home PC and some internet connection so try it out and see if you like it.

Values: If you value the solving of an intricate, convoluted problem, for it's own sake and find that rewarding, then any engineering job will come easily.

Education: Firm basis in Maths and the sciences. People are hired into engineering positions here from backgrounds such as science and computing primarily.

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Realist
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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My Job as Receptionist in a 4 Star Hotel

Megan Elsey works as a receptionist at Cork’s four star River Lee Hotel. She tells us about life at the front desk.

Why did you choose a career in tourism?

As soon as I started my first job working in a bar I knew I wanted to do something which involved being face-to-face with the public. I considered doing a Bar Management course at college, but after a little research I soon worked out that I would have a broader and more pliable skillset by doing Hotel Management. As soon as I started my first year placement at The River Lee Hotel I knew I had made the right choice. Since then I have held various roles and enjoyed the different challenges that they bring.

What advice would you give future hoteliers?

Find a good company, like The Doyle Collection which owns The River Lee, that has a culture of providing training to everyone from the bottom all the way to the top. It is hard work and everyone has bad days, but the rewards are fantastic so be prepared for a challenge. People notice what you do even when nothing is said directly to you, so always give what you can.

What do you do each day?

No two days are the same, just as no two guests are the same. At the front desk, I am viewed by guests as the voice of the hotel. We are their first interaction and their last impression, as well as providing help with any questions or queries about the hotel or local area during their stay. I also have many duties that the guest does not see, such as cash handling and sorting out reservations. What does your role entail? There are many different elements to my current role. First and foremost is providing guest satisfaction. We must go above and beyond for our guests. Secondly, I am a training buddy to new members of the team. This gives people a ‘go to’ person if they have any questions which can be less intimidating than going to management. My last role is to help out the rest of the team whenever needed.

What kind of person do you feel would suit your job?

The most important attribute a person should have is an eagerness to learn and progress. If you don’t then you can become stagnant and stuck in a rut. Being confident and outgoing is important, but it can also be developed within the right company.

What are your plans for the future?

I 100% want to stay in the hotel business. I would like to increase my knowledge and skills within the sales and marketing sector. This could be either a short-term placement, one day a week in the office here, or an industry-recognised course. Within the next few years I aim to become a duty manager at the hotel. The long-term goal is to either become a general manager or to work in the sales and marketing department at group head office.

What kind of person do you feel would suit your job?

The most important attribute a person should have is an eagerness to learn and progress. If you don’t then you can become stagnant and stuck in a rut. Being confident and outgoing is important, but it can also be developed within the right company.

What are your plans for the future?

I 100% want to stay in the hotel business. I would like to increase my knowledge and skills within the sales and marketing sector. This could be either a short-term placement, one day a week in the office here, or an industry-recognised course. Within the next few years I aim to become a duty manager at the hotel. The long-term goal is to either become a general manager or to work in the sales and marketing department at group head office

Article by: 'Get a Life in Tourism' Publication 2015