Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Jason Ruane from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

Jason Ruane

Computer Programmer

Intel

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Jason Ruane

Possibly useful qualities/interests:

A predisposition towards technical problems, such as puzzles or machinery. An interest in the nature of how things work, such as the desire to disassemble machinery/gadgetry to unlock its inner workings.

An inventive side; one who uses the parts of other gadgets, to make a new personalised gadget. Interested in high tech gear: gadgetry of all forms.

A capacity to learn processes for oneself e.g. seeing a puzzle solved and then repeating it.

Skills: Technical subjects such as Maths or electronics. Programming is very accessible to anyone with a basic home PC and some internet connection so try it out and see if you like it.

Values: If you value the solving of an intricate, convoluted problem, for it's own sake and find that rewarding, then any engineering job will come easily.

Education: Firm basis in Maths and the sciences. People are hired into engineering positions here from backgrounds such as science and computing primarily.

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Social?
Social
The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Senior Economist - OECD

"Recruitment is rigorous but careers are rewarding." William Hynes, Senior Economist - OECD

My career began at Trinity College Dublin, where I was a student in economics for six years. I gradually built up my knowledge of maths, statistics and economic theory through graduate courses.

As my studies and research developed through a Marie Curie Fellowship at the London School of Economics and my doctoral studies at Oxford University, I began applying the tools and insights of economics to historical and policy-related questions.



My interests were mostly in the area of international economic policy and globalisation. Following a number of short-term policy related roles, I got my first taste of international organisations working as an economic affairs officer in the Office of the Deputy Director General at the World Trade Organisation. While there I helped launch the aid-for-trade initiative to mobilise support to developing countries to connect to global markets and overcome their supply-side constraints.

I continued to work on these issues during my first assignment at the OECD beginning in 2009, while also contributed to the green growth agenda looking at how developing countries could achieve economic and environmental goals simultaneously.

In October 2014, I became a senior economist working on New Approaches to Economic Challenges (NAEC) in the Office of the Secretary General. This initiative is an organisation-wide reflection process to draw lessons from the financial and economic crisis to improve OECD analytical frameworks and policy advice. While developing my policy career, I remain connected to academia through an adjunct professorship in international economics at Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies.

Before I joined I was well aware of the OECD as a source of comparable economic data, but I was unfamiliar with the breath of its activities. The OECD welcomes 40,000 delegates every year, in 250 committees, working parties and expert groups covering a diverse range of public policies. Delegates aided by secretariat come together to agree rules and standards, think about, review and discuss how pressing economic, social and environmental problems can be tackled. OECD offers challenging and interesting opportunities.

Recruitment is rigorous but careers are rewarding. It has a multi-cultural environment, with staff from various backgrounds with different expertise. It is a great institution in which to learn more about the policy-making process, the machinery of public policy and to be part of a team that helps governments address key global challenges through better policies for better lives.

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Article by: William Hynes