Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Kerrie Horan from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Kerrie Horan

Engineer - Process

Intel

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  Kerrie Horan

A day for a Process Engineer at Intel can range from spending all day in what we call our 'bunny suits' or space suits as most people would recognise them as or a day of juggling meetings with working on long term projects that have a quality improvement for your product or have a cost saving for the factory. The key thing is to be adaptable, be organised and be able to communicate your plans clearly and concisely. You will be your own boss in many instances as an engineer and it is up to you to get the job done and do it well, while at the same time meeting goals and challenges that are set for the factory.

The great thing about a process engineer at Intel is that much or your work can be done remotely, which means you don't have to sit at your desk all day allowing you to get in to the machines and get stuck in. One should also be aware that you will be continuously learning in this sort of environment. Because our technology is so up to date we are always making changes to make this possible. Our products will range from mobile phone chips to top of the range computer chips so we need to be able to make changes to meet the demands of what the market is looking for.

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Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Third Secretary Dept. of Foreign Affairs and Trade

"I oversee the provision of consular and passport services to Irish holidaymakers and residents in Spain and Tunisia." Caitlin Higgins, Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade / Civil Service. 

Following the completion of a PhD in History in Trinity College Dublin, I joined the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in 2012, prior to Ireland’s EU Presidency.

My first role was in Europe Division, where I worked on a range of policy issues relating to Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia.

Anglo Irish Division

I subsequently moved to the Department’s Anglo Irish Division, where my duties included support for organisations involved in reconciliation work on the island of Ireland. I was also involved in planning for upcoming official commemorations of the 1916 Easter Rising.

In mid-2015 I was assigned to the Irish Embassy in Madrid, which is also accredited to Tunisia. Madrid is Ireland’s busiest consular mission, with around 1.3 million visits by Irish people to Spain each year. It deals with over 25% of consular cases involving Irish people worldwide.

In my role as Consul, I oversee the provision of consular and passport services to Irish holidaymakers and residents in Spain and Tunisia. My roles in the Department to date have been interesting and varied. I would certainly recommend it to any graduate who is considering their future options.

gradpublicjobs.ie

Article by: Caitlin Higgins