Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Kerrie Horan from Intel to give some advice for people considering this job:

Kerrie Horan

Engineer - Process

Intel

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Kerrie Horan

A day for a Process Engineer at Intel can range from spending all day in what we call our 'bunny suits' or space suits as most people would recognise them as or a day of juggling meetings with working on long term projects that have a quality improvement for your product or have a cost saving for the factory. The key thing is to be adaptable, be organised and be able to communicate your plans clearly and concisely. You will be your own boss in many instances as an engineer and it is up to you to get the job done and do it well, while at the same time meeting goals and challenges that are set for the factory.

The great thing about a process engineer at Intel is that much or your work can be done remotely, which means you don't have to sit at your desk all day allowing you to get in to the machines and get stuck in. One should also be aware that you will be continuously learning in this sort of environment. Because our technology is so up to date we are always making changes to make this possible. Our products will range from mobile phone chips to top of the range computer chips so we need to be able to make changes to meet the demands of what the market is looking for.

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Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Executive Officer - Department of An Taoiseach

"I deal with builders, with craftsmen and women, with artists and sculptors, with the huge cross-section of people necessary to keep such a historic building in pristine condition." Marc McManus, Executive Officer - Department of The Taoiseach. 

I joined the Civil Service, with the Department of Labour, in the 1980’s. After a number of years I took a career break to work abroad. I returned in the early 1990’s, joining the Revenue Commissioners and on returning, I moved to the Department of the Taoiseach as an EO in 2001.

In 2008 I felt that a formal educational qualification would be of benefit to me and I completed an Honors degree in Public Management, supported throughout the four year course by the Department.

IPA Public Management course

The IPA Public Management course is recognised as being highly effective in focusing on the particular issues and challenges facing the Civil Service and in providing graduates with the skills and tools necessary to meet these challenges and deliver quality outcomes.

During my time in the Department of the Taoiseach, I have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to participate in the delivery of a number of key Government initiatives, including the Customer Charter process, the OECD review of the Public Service, the Taoiseach’s Public Service Excellence Awards and the Innovation Taskforce.

I am currently working in Management Services in the Department. Obviously, given the huge historical and cultural importance of Government Buildings, myself and my colleagues play a vital role not just in supporting the Taoiseach and the day-today business of the Department, but also in maintaining and preserving one of the most recognisable and iconic architectural landmarks in the country.

I deal with the OPW, with builders, with craftsmen and women, with artists and sculptors, with the huge cross-section of people necessary to keep such a historic building in pristine condition. It is a challenging role, but one I do find genuinely rewarding at times and it certainly gives one a fresh perspective on the work of a Civil Servant.

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Article by: Marc McManus