Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Catherine Day from EU Careers to give some advice for people considering this job:

Catherine Day

Secretary General

EU Careers

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Catherine Day
I would advise them to give it a go - it doesn’t mean you have to work there long term. You must know how to speak a language other than your mother tongue reasonably well, as a good proficiency is essential. It’s also important to know and understand the cultural diversity that makes up the European Union.

Our internships are a great chance to come for a short period to determine where your interests lie and taste the experiences. Starting out your career path with the EU gives you a really good foundation of insider knowledge of how the EU works and is so useful professionally, even if you don’t plan on working there forever.

It is also important for young Irish people to consider moving to countries that are not English speaking and working for the EU would be very useful to your long term career.
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Administrative?
Administrative
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Life as an Administrative Officer in Public Expenditure and Reform

"I was attracted to the Civil Service because it offered me a role in formulating public policy at a time when Ireland’s economic challenges were most pressing." Alan Gilligan, Administrative Officer - Dept. of Public Expenditure and Reform 

I began working in the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform in June 2012 after finishing my studies of Economics in National University of Ireland, Galway


Joining the department has been a rewarding experience as I was given
responsibilities and opportunities from my first day. The department is receptive to fresh ideas brought in by new recruits and there are many opportunities to formulate policy with management at the most senior levels.

Some of the best experiences have been representing the department at meetings with the EU and IMF (International Monetary Fund), writing papers and presenting them to the management board, and attending the Dáil session on Budget day.

Overall, there is plenty of variety in the work I do and opportunities to advance further, travel and continue to influence policy.


Article by: Alan Gilligan