Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Brian Howard from Department of Education and Skills to give some advice for people considering this job:

Brian Howard

Guidance Counsellor

Department of Education and Skills

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Brian Howard

This career involves working with people in a caring capacity. If you have no interest in helping people personally or educationally then this may be the wrong profession for you.

Empathy, patience and respect are important qualities for this job, in addition to be able to relate well to the person you are dealing with. As there is also a large amount of information to be handled in the job, good organisational, IT and time management skills are also quite important.

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Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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So you want to be a Property Surveyor

Do you have a strong business acumen? Are you a creative problem-solver? Do you like dealing with people? Are you looking for a varied career that puts you at the heart of organisations globally?

Property Surveyors are highly trained professionals who specialise in one of the following areas:

  • Estate Agency

  • Commercial Property (retail, office, industrial, hotels and leisure)

  • Valuation and Investment

  • Property and Facilities Management

  • Arts and Antiques

  • Forestry and Rural Land


Where do they work?

Property Surveying is a surprisingly varied career, and surveyors work in all aspects of industry, both private and public sectors.

As a surveyor in private practice, you might find yourself advising Google on where best to locate their new offices or helping Forever 21 identify the best retail pitch in Dublin. In terms of residential property, a surveyor’s clients can vary from a young couple buying their first home to an international film director looking for a short-term letting. Surveyors provide expert advice to financial institutions and pension funds on property investments. As a surveyor in the public sector, you could be at the heart of Government decisions regarding State owned properties and portfolios, including forestry.

What sort of subjects should you be interested in to pursue a career in this area?

An interest in business and an aptitude for maths are a distinct advantage. But property is a wide ranging career, and courses include subjects such as law, economics, Information Technology and management. Surveyors are consummate communicators, so you should be good at English.

It’s worth noting that property surveying tends to be a very sociable and team-based career – ideal for those who enjoy interacting with and meeting lots of new people.


Article by: SCSI - The Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland