Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Elaine MacDonald from St. Michael's House to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Elaine MacDonald

Psychologist - Clinical

St. Michael's House

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  Elaine MacDonald

Make sure you are willing to go the full distance in terms of the time needed to train as a Clinical Psychologist – it’s typically at least six years academic study, and invariably this period is interspersed with work in a relevant field.

Do be as confident as you can that you’re happy being a “listener” and “observer”, as you will spend significant amounts of time in your work life as a Clinical Psychologist being in this role, as well as being in the “do-er” role and being in the limelight.

To have a good ‘fit’ with this career you’ll need to be happy working with people – as individuals on a one to one basis, with groups (e.g. families), and as part of a team in the workplace.

You need to have a good attention to detail as the job needs good observation skills, record keeping, and organisation skills.

Be prepared for learning and self-development to be on-going for the whole of your career because, as a Clinical Psychologist, you’ll be learning and using techniques and intervention approaches that are being constantly developed, and be working in accordance with policies and laws that are also constantly evolving.

The last piece of advice I’d give to someone considering this job is to be as sure as you can that you feel comfortable and even excited at the prospect of your career revolving around people and groups with all the varied, diverse, and unpredictable rewards and challenges that this brings!

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So you want to be a Geomatic Surveyor

Have you ever wondered who creates the maps that we use on our Smart Phones and SatNavs?

Geomatic Surveyors are the professionals responsible for collecting, processing, managing and analysing geographic information. By creating “intelligent maps”, the surveyor adds information which could, for example, allow you find where you can get the best pizza in town!

Geomatic Surveyors use cutting-edge technologies including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), satellites, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and laser scanning, together with state-of-the-art information technologies, in their quest to capture information and convert it into useful, intelligent maps and 3D models.

The profession is experiencing significant growth as consumers and businesses increasingly use location based services and big data initiatives.

Where do they work?

As extremely versatile professionals, Geomatic Surveyors work in every corner of the world, from the ice caps of Antarctica to the mines of Africa and deep waters harbours of Australia - as well as here in Ireland. Geomatic careers entail great diversity, involving indoor and outdoor work locations as well as individual and team-based activities.

Career prospects are high and progression opportunities are excellent - globally, Geomatic Surveyors, including recent graduates, are in full employment and it is predicted that there will be a shortage of qualified graduates to meet the needs of the geo-services industry in the coming years.

What sort of subjects should you be interested in to pursue a career in this area?

This is a profession ideally suited to students who enjoy working with numbers. You should have a good spatial awareness, and an interest in geography and information technology. Creativity is also important as the mapping and 3D modelling requires good design skills.

 


Article by: SCSI - The Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland