Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Paul Dowling from Teagasc to give some advice for people considering this job:

Paul Dowling

Horticulturist

Teagasc

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Paul Dowling
Ideally, try and get a job in the industry for a summer, or get a bit of experience before you go into it. You have to be happy with working outside, and doing physical work. If you are not prepared to work hard or are looking for a soft job, don't go into Landscaping. Design is very sexy at the moment, everyone wants to be a designer, a Landscape Designer. It's different on the ground, you have to be out there on sites in all weather and you have to make sure projects are managed well and you're able to muck in with everyone else. Biology is most important for anyone going into Horticulture or Landscaping as it covers propagation and helps with the identification of plant names, species and families through the universal use of Latin. Chemistry is also helpful as the use of various chemicals is a constant in horticulture. The chemical content and dangers of fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides in use in Amenity Horticulture needs to be understood anyone going into this business. Geography would be a relevant subject as well. Also, the simple things like having a full, clean driving licence, which can make you a lot more employable if you are trying for a job with a Landscape Conractor. This indicates that you are more mobile and can also drive a company van if needed. Be sure you're happy with the outdoor life. Having taken a Horticulture course will give you an advantage. However, it's possible to take a job first and study later, e.g. in IT Blanchardstown it is possible to study at night. I think you cannot beat doing the Diploma Course in the National Botanic Gardens because it is a good practical course which also covers all the theory and is invaluable for gaining plant knowledge.
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Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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A Day in the Life of a Solar Physicist

“The other project with which I’m involved is Solar Orbiter. It is in its infancy, but is expected to be launched by ESA in 2015 and is a mission to orbit the Sun.” – Louise Harra, Solar Physicist

A typical day? Well that depends! My job consists of several aspects. The first and main one is research. For that I make use of spacecraft and ground-based observatory datasets to try and understand explosions on the Sun. 

This involves a lot of computing work, and also much collaboration internationally.

All of our space missions are international collaborations. Our main hardware partners are in Japan and the US.

Ground-based observatories are all over the world from Poland to China to Argentina. 

We make use of the internet to get access to many of these datasets, but also have opportunities to meet with people from around the world, design observing campaigns, and help design new spacecraft in the future.

Another aspect in my job is teaching. I lecture to first year undergraduates in astronomy. This is a lot of fun, as it is an interesting subject to teach, and many students have already tried their hand at astronomy to some level. 

I also supervise PhD students and am the graduate tutor for our department. Graduate level teaching is very different as the aim is for each student to leave as an independent and confident researcher. 

The interaction between ‘teacher’ and student is different from that at undergraduate level as it concerns research: the answers are never known in advance so new territory is always being explored.

As with many other parts of my job, there is travelling involved to meet with collaborators in Japan and the US – and following the launch I hope to spend an extended period in Japan where the spacecraft operations will take place.

The other project with which I’m involved is Solar Orbiter. There are a lot of technical challenges for a mission such as this, and I am working with top-class engineers to ensure that we have a suitable instrument design and safe technology to successfully carry out this mission.

This work is being done in collaboration with other European colleagues from Belgium, France, and Germany.

 

 


Article by: Louise Harra ~ Institute of Physics in Ireland