Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lorcan Kelly from Irish Tax Institute to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lorcan Kelly

Tax Consultant

Irish Tax Institute

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  Lorcan Kelly
I would strongly recommend a career in tax to any students who are considering it. Tax professionals are in high demand from employers and can add real value to any business. It is a challenging and rewarding career which can place you at the heart of business decision making. It can also be an excellent springboard to other careers in finance.

Just recently a new Chief Financial Officer was appointed to Irish Distillers who was formerly the Pernod Ricard Group tax director! Also do your research about the AITI Chartered Tax Adviser (CTA) qualification – from my own experience, the course is very practical and relevant to my day to day job. It provides a structured framework for achieving the knowledge of tax law and skills required to be an AITI Chartered Tax Adviser (CTA).
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The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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My Life as a Female Butcher

"When I tell people what I do, their reactions differ. The men in the industry think it's a novelty that I'm a girl. They're just so proud that any young person still wants to learn the trade.", Amelia Watts, Apprentice Butcher 

One Saturday, after a long day breaking down animal carcasses, I changed into my street clothes and bundled into a cab, before the driver asked: “Been buying lamb?” I didn't like to tell him that smell was me.

The smell was clinging to my skin and hair, despite having spent the day covered up in overalls and a hat. That was a shock – it's safe to say I haven't gone out straight from work since.

I have always loved food, but being a chef seemed so anti-social, and I wanted to be more involved in where the food came from. I had a bit of experience of unusual meat from my other interest, historical re-enacting, so I knew the blood and guts didn't bother me. It's fascinating seeing where the different cuts of meat come from, like doing a big reverse jigsaw puzzle.

When I first became a female butcher, I underestimated how physical it was going to be. I have to handle huge pieces of meat, like an entire side of pig, which is kept at such a low temperature that your bones ache and your hands throb with the cold. It can make working with very sharp knives pretty dangerous.

Your shoulders also hurt from lifting and I've made so many sausages in a day it gave me a crick in my back. Having said that, I do enjoy it (!) – there aren't too many jobs where you find yourself physically exhausted at the end of each day.

As a result, the sleeves of my T-shirts are starting to feel tighter, particularly on the sausage-making side of my body. It makes me a bit self-conscious on a night out. I'm a girlie girl, so having one big bicep isn't ideal. But I never want to be as exhausted as I was in my first week, so I try to see my new strength as a good thing. I could beat most of the men I know in an arm wrestle.

When I tell people what I do, their reactions differ. The men in the industry think it's a novelty that I'm a girl. They're just so proud that any young person still wants to learn the trade. Other guys I've told think it's cool – especially my boyfriend. It's only really a minority of people who turn their noses up at the gore.

Not everyone would care for the uniform either – overalls, hair back, no nail polish or perfume thanks to environmental health. But I do wear some make-up to work – no one needs to see my bare face at 6am.

My biggest fear is getting something wrong and ruining someone's Christmas dinner. In this job, if you get it right and sell a perfect cut of meat, you could make a family's Christmas Day. That’s what it’s all about.

Amelia Watts speaking to Tory Frost ~ The Telegraph 


Article by: Tory Frost