Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lorcan Kelly from Irish Tax Institute to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lorcan Kelly

Tax Consultant

Irish Tax Institute

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  Lorcan Kelly
I would strongly recommend a career in tax to any students who are considering it. Tax professionals are in high demand from employers and can add real value to any business. It is a challenging and rewarding career which can place you at the heart of business decision making. It can also be an excellent springboard to other careers in finance.

Just recently a new Chief Financial Officer was appointed to Irish Distillers who was formerly the Pernod Ricard Group tax director! Also do your research about the AITI Chartered Tax Adviser (CTA) qualification – from my own experience, the course is very practical and relevant to my day to day job. It provides a structured framework for achieving the knowledge of tax law and skills required to be an AITI Chartered Tax Adviser (CTA).
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The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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A day in the life of a Medical Physicist

"When injected, this radiopharmaceutical will travel to certain parts of the patients’ anatomy. Then we can use a Gamma Camera to image that part of the anatomy" - Una O'Connor, Medical Physicist

It’s only 8:00am but in one hour patients will be arriving for their Nuclear Medicine scans, so need to get those injections prepared. This is my first task of the day, combining pharmaceuticals with radioactive tracers to make up all the different patient injections.

When injected, this radiopharmaceutical will travel to certain parts of the patients’ anatomy. Then we can use a Gamma Camera to image that part of the anatomy. The images are used for diagnostic information and to help make clinical decisions.

I work at a specially designed cabinet in the Radiopharmacy. The cabinet is shielded with lead, which will attenuate almost all the radiation that I’m working with. I have to manipulate vials and syringes of radioactive material but it is all contained in lead pots and lead syringe shields so I am very well protected from the radiation.

Some of the radioactive material needed for today’s clinic comes ready-prepared in capsules from the manufacturer, in which case I don’t have to prepare the injection. Instead, I measure the activity of each capsule in a dose calibrator and make sure it is the correct dose for the patient.

I know it has decayed since the manufacturer measured it, so I calculate the expected activity and this matches well to what I measured in the dose calibrator, so I’m happy with my results.

I’m finished in time for a 9.30am meeting with a consultant dermatologist to review our progress on a research project we’re undertaking in Ultraviolet Phototherapy. UV radiation is used very successfully in hospitals to treat skin conditions, but the dose has to be very carefully controlled.

We are investigating the different methods for testing the patients’ skin before treatment starts – there’s always room for improvement and new devices coming on the market all the time. The project is progressing well so we decide to submit our results for presentation at an upcoming scientific conference…. it will be good to share the results from our study and hopefully get some feedback from other physicists.

After lunch, it’s over to the university part of the hospital to give a lecture to a group of doctors and nurses about laser safety and the hazards they might encounter in the course of their work. The group is full of questions and we have a good discussion afterwards about their practical experiences with lasers.

I drop into the library after the lecture to download a new report on X-ray image quality as I’m testing a new digital X-ray room next week - no more films! Will have a read of it for any new recommendations, but I’ll have to leave that task until tomorrow.

Una O’Connor ~ www.iopireland.org

Article by: Una O'Connor - Institute of Physicists Ireland