Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:

Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer

STEPS

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Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.
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Administrative
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Danielle Romeril - Irish Fashion Designer

Danielle Romeril – Leading Irish Fashion Designer

I chose to study Fashion Design in Limerick School of Art and Design, LIT as the course is nationally and internationally acclaimed.  It is also the only fashion programme in Ireland which showcases at Graduate Fashion Week in London and offers the opportunity for excellent work placement all over the world.

After completing my studies in LIT, I achieved a Masters in Fashion Design from Royal College of Art, London in 2010.

Having worked with Sharon Wauchob (Paris) and Alberta Ferretti (Italy). I launched my first bespoke contemporary womenswear label in 2013 and have since showcased every year at London Fashion Week.

My label currently retails in 10 countries worldwide and regularly features in publications such as Vogue, Elle, Tatler, Grazia and Marie Claire.

My collection is a vibrant, youthful womenswear label with a relaxed yet considered aesthetic. My focus is on extraordinary fabric combinations and surface details and to be innovative and fresh when it comes to contemporary womenswear design.  

danielleromeril.com

For me, it started in LIT

Danielle Romeril
Leading Irish Fashion Designer
LIT Graduate 2007 – Fashion BA (Honours) in Design    


Article by: LIT