Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Claire Hanrahan from CRH plc to give some advice for people considering this job:

Claire Hanrahan

Auditor

CRH plc

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Claire Hanrahan

The candidate needs to have a desire to travel. That is the most important. Travel is a vital part of the role of Internal Auditor at CRH. Your travel percentage ranges between 40% - 70% per year. They do try to keep it at a minimum but with a high staff turnover, you could be placed on additional audits that are short staffed.

You need to get on with all the people you work with also as you're away with these people for 4 nights a week for 4 weeks. You need to be friendly and outgoing and easy to get along with as it can get stressful on jobs so the last thing you want is someone who has attitude problems or can't communicate properly! Those 2 aspects are the most important for me.

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Investigative?
Investigative
The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Career Interests


What are your Career Interests?

Naturalist?
Naturalist 
Not surprisingly, some aspect of the natural sciences will run through the Naturalists interests - from ecological awareness to nutrition and health. People with an interest in horticulture, land usage and farming (including fish) are Naturalists.

Some Naturalists focus on animals rather than plants, and may enjoy working with, training, caring for, or simply herding them. Other Naturalists will prefer working with the end result of nature's produce - the food produced from plants and animals. Naturalists like solving problems with solutions that show some sensitivity to the environmental impact of what they do. They like to see practical results, and prefer action to talking and discussing.


A Theory of Career Interests

The idea of career interests has been made famous by the work of John Holland, an American psychologist who has been researching this area for over 30 years. His theory is based on the following main ideas:

Bullet People can be generally described using six categories of interests and attitudes that capture the spirit of the individuals they profile.
Bullet People are best described using combinations of these categories. Most people can be best described using two or three categories.
Bullet The categories that represent an individuals interests are the result of many influences, including family, upbringing, cultural environment, educational opportunities, school and work experience and so on.
Bullet Occupations can also be described using the same six categories.
Bullet Work environments also have distinct characteristics, and can equally be classified using the same six categories
Bullet People who work in occupations and environments that have related characteristics are more likely to feel comfortable and motivated with their work and develop satisfying careers

We use a localised adaptation of Hollands categories to assist with categorising occupations and courses throughout this site. A summary of the types is presented below. Click on the category titles to get further information.

Interest Categories
Realist 
R 
Realistic occupations involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outdoors. 
Administrative 
A 
Administrative occupations involve working with data and details more than with ideas and people. These people like clear routines and instructions, and enjoy checking facts and figures. 
Enterprising 
E 
Enterprising occupations involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business. 
Investigative 
I 
Investigative occupations involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally. 
Social 
S 
Social occupations involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others. 
Creative 
C 
Creative occupations involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules. 
Linguistic 
L 
Linguistic types enjoy work involving the creation and exchange of information through writing, electronic media or the spoken word. These people prefer unstructured environments where there is time to use their imagination to compose their thoughts. 
Naturalist 
N 
Naturalists' like work that involves 'doing' something to 'organic things', i.e. plants, animals and their produce (e.g. food). Like Realists, Naturalists enjoy a hands-on approach, and like to see tangible results. 

Online Resources
Veterinary Science for All Walks of Life 
  A veterinary careers information booklet that explains the many different career options available with a veterinary degree.
Career Interests

John Holland's theory has been used worldwide to help categorise workplaces and the occupations within them. The official test to measure your interests is the SDS - Self Directed Search, which can be taken online for a small fee.
[link is to a site outside of CareersPortal]