Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:

Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer

STEPS

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Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.
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The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Look into Law Transition Year Programme

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Look into Law Transition Year Programme


Friday, October 06, 2017 




Look into Law Transition Year Programme

‘The Bar of Ireland's "Look into Law" Transition Year Programme is an exciting initiative aimed at increasing students' awareness of the work of The Bar of Ireland and to encourage students to consider a career as a barrister.

This annual "Access all areas" programme, takes place on Monday 5th to Friday 9th February 2018, the programme aims to encourage schools and students from a wide cross-section of society to apply to take part.

The programme is aimed in particular at those who would otherwise have no access to the Bar. To help achieve this, 20% of places are reserved for DEIS schools. 100 places are available with 20% given to DEIS schools and the remaining places allocated by a random lottery draw performed by The Bar of Ireland on Wednesday 22nd November 2017.

The progamme is open to students form Transition Year up to 6th year and the application process will open Monday 23rd October and close at 5pm on Monday 20th November 2017.

Because of the high levels of interest in this programme and the limit of 100 places, schools are asked to nominate one student per year to participate in the programme.

Applications can only be made through the school and not individually. Any applications received outside the application process dates will not be accepted.’