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Michael Bohane

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BioPharmachem Ireland

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Be prepared for responsibility and the rewards and problems that come with responsibility. It is very important to be comfortable making decisions and living with them. While it is impossible to be right all of the time the majority of decisions you make have to be correct.
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Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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TY students dive into marine science and technology at Marine Institute

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TY students dive into marine science and technology at Marine Institute


Monday, February 27, 2017 




TY students dive into marine science and technology at Marine Institute

The Marine Institute held its third annual transition year training week from the 27th February to 3rd March 2017, at its headquarters in Galway. Over twenty transition year students from Mayo, Galway, Kerry, Cork and Kildare participated in a wide range of interactive activities, increasing their understanding of and interest in marine science, research, engineering, and technology careers.

Scientists and staff from the Marine Institute, the state agency responsible for marine research and innovation, welcomed the opportunity to share their passion and insights across a wide range of areas of marine science and maritime sectors at the Institute.

The TY training course offers students an intensive week of shadowing scientists and staff learning about marine science, technology and engineering as well as a range of diverse supporting disciplines. Promoting ocean literacy, the students took part in interactive experiments involving IT applications, marine environment and food safety, fisheries sciences, research vessel operations as well as advanced mapping, maritime development and communications.

If you are interested in applying for the 2018 Marine Institute Transition Year Programme please keep an eye on the news section of our website www.marine.ie  or look out for an update on the monthly careers portal newsletter.

To learn more about some of the interesting careers that the TY Programme provides an insight in to, be sure to visit our dedicated marine sector profile, here. You can view our new career videos, which give a brief overview of the work that is done by Marine Institute personnel in the areas of seabed mapping, oceanography, fisheries assessment and research vessel operations.

Over twenty TY students attend the Transition Year Training Week at the Marine Institute in Galway, overseen by and Catherine Quigley-Johnston, HR manager. Photo Cushla Dromgool-Regan

To view images of the TY training week go to the Marine Institute Facebook page here