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Occupation Details

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Process Development Scientist

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require qualifications at NFQ Levels 7 or 8 (Ordinary / Honours Degrees) but some do not.

Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, you may need to complete three - four years of college and work for several years in the career area to be considered qualified.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Job Zone Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, computer programmers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and financial analysts.

€32k > 60
Process Development Scientist
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€32 - 60
Related Information:
Development Chemist: 30 - 65
Process Chemist: 35 - 55
Analytical Chemist: 30 - 55
Data Source(s):
Brightwater / CPL / Hudson

Last Updated: February, 2017

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Researches and develops ways to make products from raw materials, solving problems and making improvements in existing processes.


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The Work header image

Process development scientists find and develop new processes, as well as improving existing ones. They work to reduce costs, increase efficiency and safety, improve product quality and find environmentally-friendly processes.

Once scientists have developed a research prototype of a new product in the laboratory, process development scientists find out how to standardise the item and produce it on a larger scale. This is known as 'scaling up'. Process development scientists study technical reports of the prototype. Then, they write their own reports to specify how the process needed to develop it should work.

They are very much part of a team, working alongside people such as research scientists, engineers and technicians. For example, they discuss computer-aided design (CAD) models and research papers. They get advice from engineers to make sure the right materials are available to make the product. Process development scientists can work with suppliers, contract managers and customers. They might lead teams, including other scientists and technicians, and have overall responsibility for the cost, safety and timescale of the project.

Increasingly, process development scientists also need to take account of environmental issues. They consider ways to reduce the amount of energy used in the process, or the possibility of using materials that can be recycled. They plan and carry out a pilot test on the most promising process, carefully recording and analysing the results. This might uncover technical problems that they must solve before manufacturing can begin.

When a decision has been made on the best process to use, they set up and test the process in the laboratory, studying it carefully. Process development scientists often use sophisticated technology, including computers, to monitor process and production trials, and to find and identify faults. They use technology to measure and control conditions such as pressure and temperature, for example, in metal and aerospace industries.

Process development scientists also carry out risk assessments to make sure the process is safe, and to identify any training needs for the staff who will use the new equipment and technology. They check and follow safety laws and regulations. They evaluate the process trials, identifying and tackling any problems. Depending on the results of these trials, full-scale production will then begin.

Process development scientists regularly evaluate production, demonstrating that the process is an improvement on the previous one and identifying any new steps, methods or technology needed to make sure the process keeps improving. If they need to, they will advise that a piece of machinery or a raw material must be changed to make the process more efficient or to reduce costs.

Process development scientists sometimes need to wear protective clothing such as gloves and masks. They might have to travel to production sites, to assess a trial or full-scale production.


Personal Qualitiesheader image

As a process development scientist, you must have an investigative and analytical mind, and a methodical approach to testing new processes. You will need to be creative and have good problem solving skills.  
 
Process development scientists often work closely with research department specialists, so you must have good teamwork and interpersonal skills. The ability to write clear and accurate reports is essential. You may lead a team of technicians, so you must be able to organise and motivate people.  
 
Many processes are being constantly improved, so you must be willing to learn and develop new knowledge, and keep up-to-date with technological advances. Increasingly, process development scientists need to be aware of environmental issues. You must also be willing to follow safety procedures closely. Work can be very stressful during periods when experiments and deadlines have to be met.


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This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Mechanical Engineering & Manufacturing
Electrical & Electronic Engineering

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