Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Damien Mason from CRH plc to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Damien Mason

Mechanical Engineer

CRH plc

Read more

  Damien Mason

If you are really interested in people and have good interpersonal skills, you will find this job very rewarding.

Like a lot of jobs, you will not be using all the theoretical knowledge you gained in University or College, but you will develop significant management potential and the environment is stimulating and rewarding.

As an engineer, you will probably spend about 50% of your time in the office, and the other 50% out in the plant.

You should also expect that you may be asked if you are willing to travel abroad. This would be very attractive to most people, and a definite means to gain great experience, but it may not suit everyone.

You should ideally be a balanced person, someone with a good deal of technical knowledge, but also a good ability to deal with people.

Responsibility and challenges will be given to you from day one, and if you can handle the pressure, you will gain more and more responsibilities, ultimately leading you to gain invaluable experience, and undoubtedly onto a successful management position.

With the global nature of ICL's parent company CRH, this could be yours in Ireland or one of many countries worldwide.

Close

Social?
Social 
The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
Career Interviews
Sector Profiles
School Subjects (LC)
College Courses
Close
Study Skills
Other
Work Experience (School)
CV & Interview Preparation

Occupation Details

logo imagelogo image

Special Investigations Unit Analyst

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require qualifications at NFQ Levels 7 or 8 (Ordinary / Honours Degrees) but some do not.

Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an engineer must complete four years of college and work for several years in engineering to be considered qualified.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Job Zone Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, computer programmers, teachers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and financial analysts.

Return to List
Saves this course to your Career File if you are registered.

At a Glance... header image

Claims experts who assess insurance claims for incidence of fraud.


Videos & Interviews header image

Follow the links below to watch videos related to this occupation:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site


Go..Search YouTube for Special Investigations Unit Analyst videos

The Work header image

Special Investigations Unit (SIU) Analysts are claims experts who assess insurance claims for incidence of fraud. This role requires significant investigation skills, and involves the interrogation of internal and external data sources (including social media) and engagement wih external parties such as the Gardai, assessors and in some cases the legal community.


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

bullet

Examine claims forms and other records to determine insurance coverage.

bullet

Investigate and assess damage to property and create or review property damage estimates.

bullet

Interview or correspond with claimants, witnesses, police, physicians, or other relevant parties to determine claim settlement, denial, or review.

bullet

Review police reports, medical treatment records, medical bills, or physical property damage to determine the extent of liability.

bullet

Negotiate claim settlements and recommend litigation when settlement cannot be negotiated.

bullet

Analyze information gathered by investigation, and report findings and recommendations.

bullet

Interview or correspond with agents and claimants to correct errors or omissions and to investigate questionable claims.

bullet

Prepare report of findings of investigation.

bullet

Refer questionable claims to investigator or claims adjuster for investigation or settlement.

bullet

Collect evidence to support contested claims in court.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

bullet

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events: Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

bullet

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work: Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

bullet

Getting Information: Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

bullet

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others: Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

bullet

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships: Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

bullet

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge: Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

bullet

Documenting/Recording Information: Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

bullet

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards: Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

bullet

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People: Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

bullet

Processing Information: Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

bullet

English Language: Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

bullet

Customer and Personal Service: Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

bullet

Clerical: Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.

bullet

Law and Government: Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.

bullet

Mathematics: Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

bullet

Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

bullet

Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

bullet

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

bullet

Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively.

bullet

Negotiation: Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.

bullet

Writing: Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

bullet

Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

bullet

Active Learning: Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

bullet

Mathematics: Using mathematics to solve problems.

bullet

Coordination: Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

People in this role require significant investigation skills and communication skills.


Entry Routesheader image

Last Updated:


Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

bullet

Organisation: Insurance Institute of Ireland
Address: Insurance House, 39 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2
Tel: (01) 677 2582
Email: Click here
Url Click here

bullet

Organisation: Insurance Ireland
Address: Insurance House, 39 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2
Tel: (01) 676 1820
Email: Click here
Url Click here

bullet

Organisation: LIA
Address: LIA House, 183 Kimmage Road West, Dublin 12
Tel: 01 - 709 9850
Email: Click here
Url Click here

Job Search


Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Banking, Insurance & Financial Services

Search for Related Courses from Qualifax - the National Learners Database

Go..


Higher Ed & CAO Course suggestions
If you are interested in this occupation, then the following courses may also be of interest. Note that these course suggestions are not intended to indicate that they lead directly to this occupation, only that they are related in some way and may be worth exploring.
Courses found: 15