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Administrative

Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.

Occupation Details

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Bank / Financial Manager

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require qualifications at NFQ Levels 7 or 8 (Ordinary / Honours Degrees) but some do not.

Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, you may need to complete three - four years of college and work for several years in the career area to be considered qualified.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Job Zone Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, computer programmers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and financial analysts.

€35k > 80
Corporate Finance/Banking Director
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€25 - 170
Related Information:
Corporate Banking Administrator: 25 - 50
Corporate Banking Officer: 35 - 45
Corporate Banking Manager: 70 - 115
Corporate Finance Director: 100 - 170
Data Source(s):
Brightwater / Sigmar / Robert Walters / Hudson / Abrivia / Lincoln

Last Updated: March, 2017

Middle Office Manager / Analyst
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€35 - 80
Related Information:
Middle Office Manager: 55 - 80
Middle Office Analyst: 35 - 55
Data Source(s):
Robert Walters

Last Updated: March, 2017

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
Shortage Indicator

Shortages have been identified in the National Skills Bulletin 2017 for the following areas:

Financial management/financial analysis: "trustee managers; deposit managers; payroll managers"

Accounting: "financial and management accountants with expertise in solvency, taxation, IFSR4 relevant skills and regulatory compliance; accountants for roles in industry with ERP system and reporting tools"

5.8%
Occupational Category

Financial Managers & Directors

Also included in this category:

Investment bankers; treasury managers.

Number Employed:

6,100

Part time workers: 11%
Aged over 55: 13%
Male / Female: 56 / 44%
Non-Nationals: 16%
With Third Level: 81%
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At a Glance... header image

Plans, directs and co-ordinate activities of workers in bank/financial setting. Establish and maintain relationships with clients, oversees the flow of cash and financial instruments.


Videos & Interviews header image

Follow the links below to watch videos related to this occupation:

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Go..Finance Manager - from: icould [UK] Video

Go..Search YouTube for Bank / Financial Manager videos

The Work header image

Bank managers work in either branch and retail management, or in some form of specialist banking service providing support to branches.  
 
Managers working in branch banking must run the bank profitably and within targets set by head office. They try to find out the banking needs of personal and business customers and promote the wide range of services the bank offers. This may include, for example, providing an automatic payroll service for an employer, or giving advice on pension funds, investments, insurance and tax to individual customers.  
 
Managers look at customers' requests for loans and overdrafts and decide on the conditions to attach to any loan facilities. Branch managers are also responsible for the day-to-day running of the branch, including personnel matters, training and monitoring work practices.  
 
Managers working in specialist banking services work in a number of different areas. These include:  
- Commercial and corporate banking  
- Information technology  
- Providing financial services.  
 
Other managers may be based at regional or head offices dealing with trusts and investments, marketing, training or human resource management. At senior level, specialist managers assist in the formulation of policy and undertake economic research work.


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Establish and maintain relationships with individual or business customers or provide assistance with problems these customers may encounter.

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Examine, evaluate, or process loan applications.

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Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of workers in branches, offices, or departments of establishments, such as branch banks, brokerage firms, risk and insurance departments, or credit departments.

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Oversee the flow of cash or financial instruments.

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Recruit staff members and oversee training programs.

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Network within communities to find and attract new business.

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Approve, reject, or coordinate the approval or rejection of lines of credit or commercial, real estate, or personal loans.

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Prepare financial or regulatory reports required by laws, regulations, or boards of directors.

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Establish procedures for custody or control of assets, records, loan collateral, or securities to ensure safekeeping.

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Review collection reports to determine the status of collections and the amounts of outstanding balances.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Selling or Influencing Others: Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

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Processing Information: Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

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Making Decisions and Solving Problems: Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

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Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge: Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

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Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards: Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

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Performing for or Working Directly with the Public: Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

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Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates: Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

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Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships: Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work: Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Provide Consultation and Advice to Others: Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Customer and Personal Service: Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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Administration and Management: Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

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English Language: Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Mathematics: Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

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Computers and Electronics: Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Monitoring: Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Writing: Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Management of Personnel Resources: Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

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Persuasion: Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.

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Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

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Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Time Management: Managing one's own time and the time of others.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

As a bank manager you'll need good communication and business skills and a methodical approach to problem solving. The ability to use and understand computers is important. You are likely to be given responsibility early on in your career.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Bank Manager - from: N.C.S. [UK]
Go..Banker, investment, corporate finance - from: GradIreland
Go..Retail banker - from: GradIreland

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Irish Banking Federation
Address: Nassau House, Nassau St. Dublin 2
Tel: (01) 671 5311
Email: Click here
Url Click here

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Organisation: Institute of Bankers in Ireland
Address: 1 North Wall Quay, Dublin 1.
Tel: (01) 611 6500
Email: Click here
Url Click here

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Banking & Financial Services
Business Management & Human Resources

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Higher Ed & CAO Course suggestions
If you are interested in this occupation, then the following courses may also be of interest. Note that these course suggestions are not intended to indicate that they lead directly to this occupation, only that they are related in some way and may be worth exploring.
Courses found: 9