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Aoife Lyons
Psychology is a very broad area and I would encourage people to reflect on the field that would suit them best. If you study pharmacy, you will graduate as a pharmacist. It is different in psychology. The role of a Clinical Psychologist differs significantly from the role of an Educational Psychologist, a Forensic Psychologist or a Sports Psychologist. A post graduate qualification will be required to practice in any of these fields. Regardless of the area of psychology that interests you, respect for and an interest in people is a key value that is required. Once you have qualifications, networks and professional bodies are a good way to meet prospective employers.
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The Social person's interests focus on some aspect of those people in their environment. In all cases the social person enjoys the personal contact of other people in preference to the impersonal dealings with things, data and ideas found in other groups.

Many will seek out positions where there is direct contact with the public in some advisory role, whether a receptionist or a counsellor. Social people are motivated by an interest in different types of people, and like diversity in their work environments. Many are drawn towards careers in the caring professions and social welfare area, whilst others prefer teaching and other 'informing' roles.
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Occupation Details

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Hotel Receptionist

Job Zone

Education
Most occupations in this zone require job specific training (vocational training) related to the occupation (NFQ Levels 5 and 6 or higher), related on-the-job experience, or a relevant professional award.

Related Experience
Previous work-related skills, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, several years of full or part-time employment in the area may suffice.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognised apprenticeship or training program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations usually involve using communication and organisational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include restaurant managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, hairdressers, and web developers.

€18k > 28
Receptionist - Hotel
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€18 - 28
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
CareersPortal

Last Updated: April, 2017

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Checks guests in and out of a hotel, makes dinner and activity reservations, arranges transport and often gives guests advice on local activities and amenities.


Videos & Interviews header image

Follow the links below to watch videos related to this occupation:

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Go..Reception Manager - from: icould [UK] Video

Go..Search YouTube for Hotel Receptionist videos

The Work header image

Hotel receptionists welcome guests as they enter the hotel, checking them in and out, issuing keys and directing them to their rooms. They may accept room reservations made on the telephone, by fax or email. Receptionists may confirm bookings in writing, often using a computer or word processor to type letters. They keep accurate records of which guests have arrived at or left the hotel.  
 
Hotel receptionists may also provide guests with information about local attractions and places of interest. They provide some additional services for the convenience of guests, such as ordering newspapers or taxis.  
 
To prepare a customer's account, receptionists must put together the cost of additional items such as drinks, telephone calls and newspapers, and include them in the final bill. Some receptionists may also deal with foreign currency exchange.  
 
Receptionists reflect the public image of the hotel; it is very important that they make guests feel welcome, answer their queries and promote the facilities of the hotel.  
 
Other tasks include general clerical work, word processing, operating the switchboard and fax machine. Hotel receptionists liaise with other departments of the hotel such as housekeeping staff to determine when a room is available for use and with porters to give assistance to guests.


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Greet, register, and assign rooms to guests of hotels or motels.

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Verify customers' credit, and establish how the customer will pay for the accommodation.

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Contact housekeeping or maintenance staff when guests report problems.

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Make and confirm reservations.

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Issue room keys and escort instructions to bellhops.

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Keep records of room availability and guests' accounts, manually or using computers.

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Perform bookkeeping activities, such as balancing accounts and conducting nightly audits.

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Post charges, such those for rooms, food, liquor, or telephone calls, to ledgers manually or by using computers.

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Compute bills, collect payments, and make change for guests.

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Record guest comments or complaints, referring customers to managers as necessary.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Performing for or Working Directly with the Public: Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

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Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships: Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

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Assisting and Caring for Others: Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

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Making Decisions and Solving Problems: Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work: Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates: Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

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Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others: Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

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Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge: Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

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Interacting With Computers: Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

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Getting Information: Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Customer and Personal Service: Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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Clerical: Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.

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English Language: Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Administration and Management: Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

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Computers and Electronics: Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Service Orientation: Actively looking for ways to help people.

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Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Social Perceptiveness: Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

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Coordination: Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

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Monitoring: Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Persuasion: Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.

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Instructing: Teaching others how to do something.

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Time Management: Managing one's own time and the time of others.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

Clear speech, a polite manner and a high standard of personal appearance are important qualities in a receptionist. You must be calm and well organised, even when working under pressure.  
 
The receptionist is usually the first person to receive a customer complaint, so you must have excellent customer service skills, tact, and know when to refer a case to the manager.  
 
Administrative work requires accuracy and attention to detail. Receptionists must be familiar with handling cash, credit cards, cheques and foreign currency. The reception office may also deal with correspondence, so you may have to use secretarial and typing skills. The ability to speak a foreign language can be useful.  
 
You should be able to operate standard office equipment, such as computers, photocopiers and fax machines.


Entry Routesheader image

As a receptionist or front office manager you can work in hotels and guesthouses across Ireland and around the world. The front desk is also a great step on the ladder to senior management roles such as Rooms Division Manager.

There are hundreds of courses available across Ireland to help you get started in the Tourism and Hospitality Sector. If full-time education doesn’t suit, you can also avail of some great apprenticeship programmes in the industry.

Courses in hotel front office management and hospitality management can help you get started at the front desk. Level 4, 5 & 6 courses in Hospitality Operations for example, can be found at the Further Education Institutes and ETB centres nationally.  

Level 7 & level 8 Degree Programmes in Hospitality Management e.g.DT408 are available at Institutes of Technology countrywide. 

See alsolist of hospitality courses from getalifeintourism.

Last Updated: November, 2015


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

Note: you will be leaving the CareersPortal Site

Go..Hotel Receptionist - from: N.C.S. [UK]

Related Occupationsheader image

Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Fáilte Ireland
Address: Amiens Street, Dublin 1
Tel: (01) 884 7700
Email: Click here
Url Click here

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