Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Damien Mason from CRH plc to give some advice for people considering this job:

Damien Mason

Mechanical Engineer

CRH plc

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Damien Mason

If you are really interested in people and have good interpersonal skills, you will find this job very rewarding.

Like a lot of jobs, you will not be using all the theoretical knowledge you gained in University or College, but you will develop significant management potential and the environment is stimulating and rewarding.

As an engineer, you will probably spend about 50% of your time in the office, and the other 50% out in the plant.

You should also expect that you may be asked if you are willing to travel abroad. This would be very attractive to most people, and a definite means to gain great experience, but it may not suit everyone.

You should ideally be a balanced person, someone with a good deal of technical knowledge, but also a good ability to deal with people.

Responsibility and challenges will be given to you from day one, and if you can handle the pressure, you will gain more and more responsibilities, ultimately leading you to gain invaluable experience, and undoubtedly onto a successful management position.

With the global nature of ICL's parent company CRH, this could be yours in Ireland or one of many countries worldwide.

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Realist?
Realist
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Occupation Details

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Export Manager

Job Zone

Education
Most occupations in this zone require job specific training (vocational training) related to the occupation (NFQ Levels 5 and 6 or higher), related on-the-job experience, or a relevant professional award.

Related Experience
Previous work-related skills, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, several years of full or part-time employment in the area may suffice.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognised apprenticeship or training program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations usually involve using communication and organisational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include restaurant managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, hairdressers, and web developers.

€50k > 60
Export Manager
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€50 - 60
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
neuvoo.com

Last Updated: August, 2017

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
Shortage Indicator

The National Skills Bulletin 2016 reports a shortage of Global and industrial managers and engineers (10 years’ experience): mostly for export-manufacturing sectors.

-4%
Occupational Category

Managers & Directors in Transport & Logistics

Also included in this category:

Transport managers; fleet managers; logistics managers; storage managers; warehouse managers

Number Employed:

6,900

Part time workers: 10%
Aged over 55: 17%
Male / Female: 84 / 16%
Non-Nationals: 10%
With Third Level: 43%
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At a Glance... header image

Works with a company helping to pursue new, international markets for their products. The work involves identifying potential clients, establishing contacts and bridging a language or culture gap to establish a trading partnership.


Videos & Interviews header image

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The Work header image

Export sales managers are responsible for managing the sale of products or services to overseas customers. They combine the results of market research with their knowledge of consumer tastes and the cultural and political background of the countries they are responsible for, in order to decide what to sell and how to sell it. The Export Sales Manager plans sales campaigns suitable for the country they are wishing to sell in.  
 
Export sales managers negotiate with customers (often in a foreign language) to try to make a sale. They may have to decide whether the product can be altered to meet the client's requirements or whether special discounts can be offered. This is usually done after consultation with product managers, factories and suppliers. Legal and ethical constraints on international trading also have to be considered. They may travel overseas to meet potential customers or they may bring them over their base in Ireland.  
 
Export sales managers provide quotations and may also be responsible for drawing up tender documents and agreeing the final contract. They process orders and check that the distribution is running smoothly and that everything is on schedule. When the product has finally been delivered, they may have to deal with any complaints or queries that occur.  
 
Other duties involve producing marketing plans, budgets and sales reports for discussion by company management. They may also organise sales briefings and conferences and visit international trade fairs.


Personal Qualitiesheader image

You'll need good organisational skills and the ability to work to deadlines. Language skills and a knowledge of economics, business and accounting are useful. The ability to use and understand computers is increasingly important.  
 
Good communication skills are vital. As so much business is conducted over the telephone, you must have a clear speaking voice. You must be able to explain complex issues to clients in a clear and simple way. You also need to have high self confidence and good persuasive and negotiating skills.


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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Sales, Retail & Purchasing

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Higher Ed & CAO Course suggestions
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Further Ed & PLC Course Suggestions
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