Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Elva Bannon from Smart Futures to give some advice for people considering this job:

Elva Bannon

Mechatronic Engineer

Smart Futures

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Elva Bannon

I found having education in a number of different areas of engineering to be beneficial to the work I am doing.

There is a whole world of possibilities out there for engineers, and it is difficult to know what subjects are necessary for the industry you will end up in. I was always interested in robotics and environmental issues, but it was not until my Masters that I really knew what I wanted to do.

General entry courses are quite useful, as you get a taste for a few different areas before you have to specialise, a lot of companies offer on the job training, and there is also the possibility of further study.

An engineering qualification teaches you so much more than just the technical subjects, but a way of looking at the world and solving problems in a logical and systematic way.

Engineers are sought after for these skills as much as the technical ones, and it opens up incredible opportunities. Engineering is not an easy route through college, but it is incredibly rewarding.

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Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Occupation Details

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Sport Psychologist

Job Zone

Education
Most of these occupations require qualifications at NFQ Levels 7 or 8 (Ordinary / Honours Degrees) but some do not.

Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, you may need to complete three - four years of college and work for several years in the career area to be considered qualified.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Job Zone Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, computer programmers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and financial analysts.

€22k > 58
Sport and Exercise Psychologist
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€22 - 58
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
CareersPortal

Last Updated: April, 2017

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
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At a Glance... header image

Applies psychological knowledge in sport settings to help athletes, coaches or sports teams reach higher levels of performance.


Videos & Interviews header image

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The Work header image

  • Consulting with athletes and teams with a view to providing psychological skills training appropriate to the individual and commensurate with their level of participation.
  • Organising and operating workshops for coaches, teachers and exercise specialists.
  • Guiding and advising clubs, schools, coaches, parents and athletes in the application of sport psychology theories and practices.
  • Assisting governing bodies in the area of planning and implementing policy relating to participation, performance and training from a psychological perspective.
  • Counselling referees to deal with the stressful and demanding aspects of their role.
  • Advising coaches on how to build cohesion within their team.
  • Helping athletes to deal with the psychological and emotional consequences of sustaining an injury.
  • Planning and conducting research in sports psychology.
  • Keeping up to date with the literature and best practice in their field.
  • Providing an arena for sports people to engage in reflective assessment of their involvement in sports and future developments.


Further Informationheader image

A detailed description of this occupation can be found on a number of online databases. Follow the link(s) below to access this information:

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Go..Sport and Exercise Psychologist - from: N.C.S. [UK]

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Contactsheader image

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Organisation: Irish Sports Council
Address: Top Floor, Block A, Westend Office Park, Blanchardstown, Dublin 15
Tel: (01) 8608800
Email: Click here
Url Click here

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Leisure, Sport & Fitness
Social & Caring

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