Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Lynsey Gargan from STEPS to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Lynsey Gargan

Manufacturing Engineer

STEPS

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  Lynsey Gargan
With regard to education I say don't worry if you think you have the wrong subjects in school. I certainly didn't have the subjects you would typically expect.

There are a number of courses that cater to different backgrounds. The most important thing is to do your research. Go to open days, talk to the colleges and generally just find out what exactly you would be getting in to.

Don't just take for granted you know what a certain course or career is all about. Think about what you like to do, and not just necessarily in school, if you find yourself being curious about how things work or how thing are made, it's a good indication that you could like something like engineering.

One of the best things about engineering is that it really can be your passport to the world. There are great travel opportunities within the industry and chances to be involved in the next big thing.

Practically every man-made product around you came from a manufacturing plant, it's a huge industry with a lot of different avenues to take. Innovation is a really big part of what engineers do. The desire to be creative and improve production and processes is an important attribute for a manufacturing engineer.
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Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Occupation Details

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Cleaner - Household

Job Zone

Education
Some of these occupations may require a Leaving Certificate or similar.

Related Experience
Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.

Job Training
Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.

Job Zone Examples
These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include taxi drivers, amusement and recreation attendants, counter clerks, construction laborers, and waiters or waitresses.

€18k >  
Cleaner, Domestic
Salary Range
(thousands per year)*
€18 -  
Related Information:
Data Source(s):
FAS

Last Updated: March, 2014

* The lower figures typically reflect starting salaries. Higher salaries are awarded to those with greater experience and responsibility. Positions in Dublin sometimes command higher salaries.
4%
Occupational Category

Elementary Cleaning Occupations

Also included in this category:

Window and street cleaners; launderers, dry cleaners and pressers; refuse disposal operatives and other refuse and salvage occupations; vehicle valeters and cleaners; chimney cleaners; toilet attendants and other elementary cleaning occupations not elsewhere classified

Number Employed:

41,600

Part time workers: 59%
Aged over 55: 17%
Male / Female: 33 / 68%
Non-Nationals: 47%
With Third Level: 15%
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At a Glance... header image

Performs any combination of light cleaning duties to maintain private households or commercial businesses, in a clean and orderly manner.


The Work header image

Domestic cleaners do housework for other people. Some cleaners are self-employed, while others work through an agency.  
 
If a cleaner is self-employed, he or she will have to find clients to work for. They will discuss with the homeowner the work that needs doing and will set a price for it.  
 
A cleaner who works for an agency will be told by the agency who the clients are and when they want work doing. The agency will give the cleaner a checklist of jobs for each client. The cleaner may collect payments (to hand over to the agency) but will not set the rates.  
 
The range of tasks done by cleaners depends on what the homeowner wants.  
 
Agency cleaners may take their own cleaning materials in a company van. Work can also involve the use of heavy cleaning equipment like industrial floor polishers. 


Tasks & Activitiesheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported tasks and activities for this occupation

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Carry linens, towels, toilet items, and cleaning supplies, using wheeled carts.

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Disinfect equipment and supplies, using germicides or steam-operated sterilizers.

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Clean rooms, hallways, lobbies, lounges, restrooms, corridors, elevators, stairways, locker rooms, and other work areas so that health standards are met.

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Empty wastebaskets, empty and clean ashtrays, and transport other trash and waste to disposal areas.

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Observe precautions required to protect hotel and guest property and report damage, theft, and found articles to supervisors.

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Replenish supplies, such as drinking glasses, linens, writing supplies, and bathroom items.

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Clean rugs, carpets, upholstered furniture, and draperies, using vacuum cleaners and shampooers.

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Dust and polish furniture and equipment.

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Keep storage areas and carts well-stocked, clean, and tidy.

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Wash windows, walls, ceilings, and woodwork, waxing and polishing as necessary.

Work Activities header image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported work activities in this occupation.

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Handling and Moving Objects:  Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

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Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships:  Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

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Performing General Physical Activities:  Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

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Getting Information:  Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

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Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material:  Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

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Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work:  Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Performing for or Working Directly with the Public:  Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

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Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates:  Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

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Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events:  Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Training and Teaching Others:  Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.


Knowledge header image

The following is a list of the five most commonly reported knowledge areas for this occupation.

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Customer and Personal Service:  Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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English Language:  Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Public Safety and Security:  Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

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Administration and Management:  Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

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Education and Training:  Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.


Skillsheader image

The following is a list of the most commonly reported skills used in this occupation.

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Service Orientation:   Actively looking for ways to help people.

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Coordination:   Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

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Reading Comprehension:   Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Active Listening:   Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Time Management:   Managing one's own time and the time of others.

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Monitoring:   Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Critical Thinking:   Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

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Speaking:   Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Social Perceptiveness:   Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

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Complex Problem Solving:   Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Personal Qualitiesheader image

If you enjoy doing practical tasks and like seeing a job through from beginning to end, this job might suit you. You should be able to use a range of cleaning equipment and materials, and you need to be fit and active, with the stamina to spend most of the time on your feet.  
 
It helps if you are well organised so you can develop an effective routine. You will need common sense and the ability to work without supervision. It is important that you are trustworthy and have respect for people's property.  
 
The job can be repetitive, but working for different homeowners offers variety. Some cleaners work in pairs so being able to work as part of a team is important.  
 
If you work for an agency, or have clients over a wide area, it would be useful to have a driving licence.


Related Occupationsheader image

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Career Guidance

This occupation is popular with people who have the following Career Interests...


...and for people who like working in the following Career Sectors:

Building, Construction & Property

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Further Ed & PLC Course Suggestions
If you are interested in this occupation, then the following courses may also be of interest. Note that these course suggestions are not intended to indicate that they lead directly to this occupation, only that they are related in some way and may be worth exploring.

Courses found: 27


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