Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Tomas Flanagan from St. Michael's House to give some advice for people considering this job:

Tomas Flanagan

Occupational Therapist

St. Michael's House

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Tomas Flanagan

I would advise anyone interested in Occupational Therapy to read up on the profession or else try to meet a qualified Occupational Therapist and talk to them about their work.

The internet can be a great resource in getting information. Also information from the universities might indicate if this is a course that is suited to you. A lot of the course work relies on you being a self-directed learner. This makes the course different to other more mainstream/academic courses as the onus is on the student to complete a lot of work independently.

As this is a caring profession an interest in working with people is a must. You also need to be a good communicator as you will be working closely with clients, families and other staff on an ongoing basis.

Organisational skills are essential to enable you to manage a caseload.

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Administrative?
Administrative
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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CV & Interview Preparation
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CV and Applications

Job Applications are the first vital step to getting a job interview. In this area, we look at how to give employers the information they need to ensure that they put you on the shortlist.

The majority of recruiters ask job applicants to complete a Job Application form, either online or on paper. Application forms typically ask you to provide standard biographical information and summary detail of your education and experience, together with some 'open' questions - these will give you a chance to highlight your suitability for the particular job.

The alternative application procedure is to submit a Curriculum Vitae (CV) accompanied by a Cover Letter.

There is a whole industry built up around how these two documents should be written, so it is wise to familiarise yourself with some of the advice available and avoid some of the potential pitfalls. In this section we provide some useful links to get you started. 

Your Cover Letter is the first thing a recruiter or potential employer will see, so it has to make a strong impact.

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce your CV in the best way possible. There is no such thing as the perfect cover letter, but following some basic pointers will help make your letter a worthy build-up to your CV. It should make a strong impact - strong enough to make the reader want to know more about you.

Your Curriculum Vitae is the other document required. It is normally written first, and then accompanied by the Cover letter.

Follow the links for useful help and advice on preparing each of these.