Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Ejiro O'Hare Stratton from Health Service Executive to give some advice for people considering this job:

Ejiro O'Hare Stratton

Clinical Nurse Manager 2

Health Service Executive

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Ejiro O'Hare Stratton

I would advise having a degree in Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations. Professional training in nursing is necessary in order to understand patient care and what standards are required to provide quality care in an acute hospital setting.

One would also have to understand the value of planning, implementing and evaluating work practices in order to get the best out of employees. The person coming into the job would need to be patient, able to negotiate and work under pressure, as well as work on their own initiative.

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Administrative
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Disability - School & College Guide
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School & College Guide

NEW DARE information video 2016

Fewer than 1% of students in Ireland now attend a special school. In the vast majority of cases mainstream schools are the first choice for parents of children with special educational needs. 

There is a range of international human rights legislation and agreements which supports inclusive education, including the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) and the UNESCO Salamanca Statement (1994). 

Schools can access a range of supports to address the needs of students with special educational needs. Every mainstream school has a learning support teacher service to complement the work of the class or subject teacher. In addition every school can apply for additional resource teaching hours or care supports to provide for students with more complex learning or care needs. (Source: NCSE, 'Choosing a School', 2013).

Responsibility for education services lies with the Department of Education and Skills. 

All children in Ireland have a constitutional right to free primary education. Children with special educational needs have the right to free primary education up to age 18. Children with disabilities are entitled to avail of free secondary education in the same way as other children. There are also specific arrangements in place for those with special educational needs.

The EPSEN implementation report (NCSE, 2006) estimated the overall prevalence of combined special educational needs categories within the education system at almost 18 per cent:

  • 8%  with mental health difficulties (including emotional and behavioural disorders, mental illness and psychological disturbance)
  • 6% with specific learning disabilities (including dyslexia, dyscalculia)
  • 2% with intellectual/general learning disabilities (1.5% mild; 0.3 % moderate, 0.1% severe, 0.02% profound)
  • 1% with physical and sensory disabilities (in particular speech and language disorder, cerebral palsy)
  • 0.5% with autistic spectrum disorders

Under EPSEN, current educational policy determines that students with special educational needs should be included, as much as possible, in mainstream classes and withdrawn for individual or small-group teaching only when it is clearly in their interests or where appropriate education for them or other students cannot be provided in the mainstream class.

Overall, there are three main types of provision to meet the range of
educational needs found among students in primary and post-primary schools in Ireland:

  • mainstream classes
  • special classes in mainstream school and
  • special schools

Wherever a child is placed, educational placements should be flexible and should be reviewed periodically as a student’s needs change.

In this area, we consider the transition from Primary School to Second Level Education for students with a disability and/or special learning needs and outline the educational supports and options available.

The section also covers the tranistion from Second Level to Third Level education, outlining the different further education and training options available. 

Video: Gives the background to both Dare & Hear 

Follow the menu items for detailed information. We will continue to update and improve the information in this section going forward.



Useful Links
National learning Network (NLN) 
Non-Government training organisation with centres in almost every county in Ireland. Each year, 5,000 people, including many who may otherwise find it difficult to gain employment, come to learn and study with NLN and to develop the skills to move forward
Choosing a School - A Guide for Parents and Guardians of Children and Young People with Special Educational Needs 
Information Publication from the National Council for Special Education(NCSE), 2013.
Useful Links:
Disability Access Route to Education
Higher Education Access Route
Student Finance