Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Tomas Flanagan from St. Michael's House to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Tomas Flanagan

Occupational Therapist

St. Michael's House

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  Tomas Flanagan

I would advise anyone interested in Occupational Therapy to read up on the profession or else try to meet a qualified Occupational Therapist and talk to them about their work.

The internet can be a great resource in getting information. Also information from the universities might indicate if this is a course that is suited to you. A lot of the course work relies on you being a self-directed learner. This makes the course different to other more mainstream/academic courses as the onus is on the student to complete a lot of work independently.

As this is a caring profession an interest in working with people is a must. You also need to be a good communicator as you will be working closely with clients, families and other staff on an ongoing basis.

Organisational skills are essential to enable you to manage a caseload.

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Linguistic?
Linguistic 
The Linguistic's interests are usually focused on ideas and information exchange. They tend to like reading a lot, and enjoy discussion about what has been said. Some will want to write about their own ideas and may follow a path towards journalism, or story writing or editing. Others will develop skills in other languages, perhaps finding work as a translator or interpreter. Most Linguistic types will enjoy the opportunity to teach or instruct people in a topic they are interested in.
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Education and Training




 
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Junior Cycle - CSPE

Subject Group: Social
These subjects explore common issues faced by all people living in society. They develop the skills and knowledge used to manage personal resources and guide human behaviour.

Brief Description:

Civic, Social and Political Education (CSPE) is taught to all Junior Certificate students. It aims to help you to become actively involved in your community, your country and the wider world.


How will CSPE be useful to me?

At the moment, there is no subject called CSPE after the Junior Cert. However, a Leaving Certificate subject called Politics and Society is likely to be introduced in the future. What you have learned in CSPE will be useful if you study Geography, Home Economics, History or Economics in the Leaving Cert.



Note: The current CSPE course will be assessed for the final year in 2016. For students beginning post primary education in September 2014, citizenship education will be a new, short course.


Course Outline
View / Download CSPE Factsheet [pdf file]
View / Download full curriculum [pdf file]
http://www.pdst.ie/node/152

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Junior Cycle Subjects  Junior Cycle Subjects
Leaving Cert Subjects  Leaving Cert Subjects

 
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