Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Elaine MacDonald from St. Michael's House to give some advice for people considering this job:

Elaine MacDonald

Psychologist - Clinical

St. Michael's House

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Elaine MacDonald

Make sure you are willing to go the full distance in terms of the time needed to train as a Clinical Psychologist – it’s typically at least six years academic study, and invariably this period is interspersed with work in a relevant field.

Do be as confident as you can that you’re happy being a “listener” and “observer”, as you will spend significant amounts of time in your work life as a Clinical Psychologist being in this role, as well as being in the “do-er” role and being in the limelight.

To have a good ‘fit’ with this career you’ll need to be happy working with people – as individuals on a one to one basis, with groups (e.g. families), and as part of a team in the workplace.

You need to have a good attention to detail as the job needs good observation skills, record keeping, and organisation skills.

Be prepared for learning and self-development to be on-going for the whole of your career because, as a Clinical Psychologist, you’ll be learning and using techniques and intervention approaches that are being constantly developed, and be working in accordance with policies and laws that are also constantly evolving.

The last piece of advice I’d give to someone considering this job is to be as sure as you can that you feel comfortable and even excited at the prospect of your career revolving around people and groups with all the varied, diverse, and unpredictable rewards and challenges that this brings!

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Studying Abroad
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Studying Abroad

Time spent studying abroad enriches a student’s life, academically and in future career terms. The experience improves foreign language development, intercultural skills, self-reliance and self-awareness. Employers value experience abroad - it can increase the students' employability and job prospects going forward.

Students opt to study abroad for different reasons: as an alternative to points pressure and the CAO system; lower entry requirements; access to courses that are not available in Ireland; or, you may simply want the experience of studying outside Ireland.

It is important to carefully consider the differences between studying here and abroad - Application procedures, duration of courses, fees, living expenses etc. as part of making an informaed decision.

The menu items in this area provide summary information on Studying in the UK, Europe, the USA, Australia and New Zealand. Each section is presented under the headings above to help with your decision-making process.

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Finding and financing study worldwide: click here