Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Catherine Day from EU Careers to give some advice for people considering this job:

Catherine Day

Secretary General

EU Careers

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Catherine Day
I would advise them to give it a go - it doesn’t mean you have to work there long term. You must know how to speak a language other than your mother tongue reasonably well, as a good proficiency is essential. It’s also important to know and understand the cultural diversity that makes up the European Union.

Our internships are a great chance to come for a short period to determine where your interests lie and taste the experiences. Starting out your career path with the EU gives you a really good foundation of insider knowledge of how the EU works and is so useful professionally, even if you don’t plan on working there forever.

It is also important for young Irish people to consider moving to countries that are not English speaking and working for the EU would be very useful to your long term career.
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Administrative?
Administrative
Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their best operating under supervisors who give clear guidelines, and performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.
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Parents Guide
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Researching Occupations

Students, as well as parents, may not realise the actual work of many occupations outside those they have experienced, or have seen on TV and films. If your child has a particular occupation in mind, then it is well worthwhile exploring the 'typical' characteristics associated with it.

In school, many students undertake a 'Career Investigation' of an occupation they think may be of interest. These are structured investigations designed to ensure the student is familiar with the more typical aspects of an occupation, as well as research into what courses or training may be required to be qualified to work.

Ask if your son or daughter has completed an investigation, and take the opportunity to discuss it with them if they have. If not, encourage them to do the research, even informally. The information required can be completed in a worksheet (or simply use it as a guide), and can be found through our occupational database.

Occupational information for Ireland is available free through the CareersPortal website here. Our database provides occupational profiles along with information from other UK and American sources. As many occupations are similar across the globe, these international links often provide additional useful information.

For each occupation we provide:

  • Simple job description
  • Video / Interviews (where available)
  • Typical Tasks (where available)
  • Job Zone (a guide to education and or experience required)
  • Qualifications Required
  • Typical Entry Routes
  • Related Sectors
  • Salary Information (where available)
  • Labour Market Information (where available)
  • Job Search (search for the occupation in recruitment sites)
  • CAO / PLC courses that may be of interest 
  • Links to Career Directions database (where available)
  • Links to international databases and videos (where available)

To find occupations to explore on this site you can select:

Action Point: If you want to research a particular occupation, use the A-Z search, otherwise explore by career sector or career interests. When you find an occupation you want to research, read through the material on the page, and follow any links that appear relevant. In particular, read any interviews or watch any videos available.

 

 


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