Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Tracey Roche from Analog Devices to give some advice for people considering this job:

Tracey Roche

Design Engineer

Analog Devices

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Tracey Roche

3 main things:

1. Be organised.

2. Try to keep a positive attitude.

3. Persevere. Working in a Design Evaluation role or indeed any electronic engineering role, requires problem-solving skills and half the battle with this is having a positive attitude. If you have a negative/pessimistic attitude, the battle to find a solution is lost before you even start. In debugging an issue, start with the basics and work from there. Like peeling an onion, gradually peel off the outter layers to reveal the inner core of the onion...as you work, you get more clues and develop a better understanding of the product/issue you are working on.

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Creative
Creative people are drawn to careers and activities that enable them to take responsibility for the design, layout or sensory impact of something (visual, auditory etc). They may be drawn towards the traditional artistic pursuits such as painting, sculpture, singing, or music. Or they may show more interest in design, such as architecture, animation, or craft areas, such as pottery and ceramics.

Creative people use their personal understanding of people and the world they live in to guide their work. Creative people like to work in unstructured workplaces, enjoy taking risks and prefer a minimum of routine.
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Career Guidance at school
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Career Guidance at school

All students in Ireland are entitled to career guidance at school. This is normally delivered by a Guidance Counsellor and other teachers with expertise in the area. They are there to help you understand about careers and help you with any decisions you have to take that effect your career prospects.

Some of the decisions you have to make while at school include:

  • What subjects you choose, and whether they are at Higher (Honours) level or Ordinary (Pass) level.
  • What combinations of subjects are best for certain courses or jobs
  • How to prepare a CV and apply for jobs
  • How to choose and apply for college courses during your last year in school
  • How to apply for courses in England or Europe

Guidance Counsellors are often very busy, and may not always have enough time to give each student the attention they would like. It is really important that you make an appointment with your Guidance Counsellor if you need information the may effect your career. They have a wealth of knowledge and experience that may be very helpful in guiding your choices..

Making an Appointment

When making an appointment with a Guidance Counsellor about career matters it is often useful to have done some research beforehand. Guidance Counsellors know a lot about what opportunities are available, but need to get to know you well to be able to help you with your decisions. The more you tell them about yourself and your circumstances the greater the chance they will be able to help you.







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Seeing the service users happy and growing in confidence. Enjoying new experiences. Working with the service users and getting to know them. Working with nice people

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