Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Brian Macken from Smart Futures to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Brian Macken

Science Communicator

Smart Futures

Read more

  Brian Macken

I would strongly advise you to do the Masters in Science Communication in DCU. It really gives you a feel for the different kinds of media and ways of explaining things. And it's a good place to make contacts, which is also useful.

I would also recommend that you read science books. Not textbooks, good popular science books are just as useful for this kind of work, as it's already been broken down into simpler language for you. And only read the ones that you're interested in - it shouldn't be a chore to read them.

But I would recommend reading outside your subject area, so if you're into physics, then read some books on biology and vice versa (everyone should read Stephen J. Gould).  However, the more knowledge you have, the more questions you'll be able to answer.

Close

Investigative?
Investigative 
The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
Career Interviews
Sector Profiles
School Subjects (LC)
College Courses
Close
Study Skills
Other
Work Experience (School)
CV & Interview Preparation

@ School - Junior Cycle Subjects

logo imagelogo image
<
Back

Science

Junior Cycle - Science

Subject Group: Science
These subjects demonstrate how to explore nature using carefully planned methods, and teach the basic methods and findings of scientific investigation.

Brief Description:

We come across science in everyday things in the world around us, both living and non-living. Studying Science in school can help you to understand the importance of science in our lives and in the environment.

By the end of Junior Cycle, you will be able to appreciate how scientists work and how scientific ideas are modified over time.
How will Science be useful to me?

Many of the skills you learn while studying science such as problem solving and investigation skills are very useful outside of school and will be of use to you in whatever job you choose to do.

In third level there are many different types of science courses on offer and many different careers open to science students. These include such occupations as: pharmacist, radiographer, doctor, dentist, technician, psychologist, astronomer, teacher, vet and researcher.

Note: The Junior Cycle is changing, and new/revised JCSA curricula are being introduced on a phased basis from September 2014. English was first new programme to be introduced, followed by Science, Irish and Business Studies.

Details of developments with the new science programme are made available here

The specification for Junior Cycle Science for introduction in September 2016 is available here.

The Junior Cycle Science Curriculum [pdf] for September 2016 is available here.
View / Download Science Factsheet [pdf file]
View / Download full curriculum [pdf file]
Course link
http://www.pdst.ie/node/2317

Return to List

Career Guidance