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Aine Ni Dhubhain

Forestry Lecturer

Forestry Careers Ireland

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Aine Ni Dhubhain
The road to becoming a lecturer is quite long; you need to have at least PhD as well as an undergraduate degree; you would also need to have experience of working as a researcher in research projects so it can take quite a while to reach a stage where you might be considered for a lecturer’s position. So patience is required.
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Subject Choice for Leaving Cert...

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Mathematics

Ed Zone

These courses enable learners to gain recognition for the achievement of considerable knowledge in a range of subject areas, as for example in the Leaving Certificate and one-year Post Leaving Certificate courses.

Courses may be academic or practical in focus, and awards that are recognised by the National Framework of Qualifications may lead to progression opportunities higher up in the framework.

Employment Opportunities
The majority of people with certificates at this level are well prepared for occupations that involve using their knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include office secretary, customer service representatives, special needs assistant, retail salespersons and childcare workers.

Level on the National Framework of Qualifications
2 Years
Duration of course
Grades Awarded

Marks Distribution 2017:
Listed below are the percentage distributions of marks from the 16395 students who sat the Higher Level Mathematics exam in 2017.

Listed below are the percentage distributions of marks from the 32334 students who sat the Ordinary Level Mathematics exam in 2017.

In brief... header image

Maths is one of the core subjects. It is compulsory in every school. Project Maths, the current leaving cert curriculum, provides students with the opportunity to gain an understanding of and familiarity with several branches of mathematics, as well as developing their overall appreciation of the subject. The branches, or ‘strands’ of the course have been chosen because they have applications in everyday life, are useful in other disciplines, and provide a foundation for further education. As a result, maths is very accessible to students at all levels.

Video: A fresh approach to Maths


Why Study this?header image

Why Study Maths

As a wide-ranging subject with many fields and applications, maths gets used everywhere, and everyone can find some use for it. For students it opens doors to careers. For citizens it enables informed decisions. For nations it provides knowledge to compete in a technological community. No longer just the language of science, maths contributes in direct and fundamental ways to business, finance, health and defence.

Whether it’s managing your monthly budget or a part of your job, mathematics has a place in everyone’s life.

Recommendations/Tips

Mathematics is available for study at three levels, Foundation, Ordinary, and Higher. Each level covers everything in the levels below it. Students are encouraged to study at the level appropriate to their needs and aspirations. Securing a minimum of a pass mark on an ordinary level paper is necessary for entry into the majority of third level college courses.

There are many careers which require or benefit greatly from having a higher level of mathematics, and it’s a good idea to research these before coming to a decision.

 


Videos & Interviews header image


Read what others say about their Leaving Cert. Subject Choices...
Wind Engineer - Des Lalor
Des Lalor, Sustainable Energy AuthorityMaths, English, Irish, Physics, Tech Drawing, Geography, French  
  go to interview...
 
Resource Teacher - Paul Galvan
Paul Galvan, Department of Education and SkillsFor my Leaving Certificate I studied English, Irish, Maths, Physics, French, Geography and History. My favourite subjects were Geography, Physics, French and English. I knew that I would like to study a combination of these subjects in further education. I think as regards a career path it’s a good idea to study subjects you like and are good at. 
  go to interview...
 
Garda Trainee - Steven Kilgannon
Steven Kilgannon, An Garda Sí­ochánaMaths / Geography / English / Irish / Irish / Construction / Biology

They didn't influence my career path. I spent my time working my way up in a hotel to gain experience in complaint handling and communication skills. 
  go to interview...
 
Lieutenant - Pilot - Air Corp - Oisin McGrath
Oisin McGrath, Defence Forces

The subjects that I took for my Leaving Certificate are..English, Irish, Maths, Physics, Biology, Geography and French.

NB: It must be noted that the Air Corps requires certain subjects and is detailed in the Cadetship Booklet!!!

 
  go to interview...
 
Teacher - Special Needs - Padraig Parle
Padraig Parle, Department of Education and SkillsHistory, Biology, French, Art, Maths, Irish and English.  Taking Art for my Leaving Cert. enabled me to go to Art College, but it was the Honours Irish which was essential to get into Primary Teaching 
  go to interview...
 
Civil Engineer - Maria O'Neill
Maria O'Neill, STEPS

In hindsight, I am happy to say I wouldn't have done anything differently to date! In my Junior Cert I did 9 subjects ; Maths, Irish, English, History, Geography, Science, Business Studies, French and Tech Graphics. I liked Languages and history the least. I won't lie, Maths, Geography, and Tech Graphics were the ones I enjoyed the most.

When I was choosing for my leaving Cert I still hadn't decided what I would do when I was finished. I was thinking of Engineering, Teaching or Physiotherapy. I wanted to leave my options open. To do physio you need a language (to get in to UCD) and 2 science subjects. I decided to do Maths, Irish, English, French, Geography, Physics and Chemistry for my leaving. That left all the options open.

I was good at Business Studies, but after looking at courses in college, I discovered you don't usually need a business subject to get into a business course. This is not the case for Science based courses. In 6th year I took up Applied Maths. Since I was doing Physics and Maths I had a good background for the subject. Twenty classes and just homework, and I got an honour. If anyone was to ask me if they should do it, if you like maths, its a great subject!

 
  go to interview...
 
Lecturer - Aoife Mc Dermott
Aoife Mc Dermott, Department of Education and SkillsIn school I took English, Irish, Maths, French, Biology, Economics and Business. The fact that I enjoyed economics in school led me to the choice of my degree.

Luckily by taking what started out as a general degree I was able to figure out that what I liked about economics was being able to pose questions and look for solutions; the critical thinking component, rather than the content was actually the part that appealed most to me.

Through exposure to a variety of subjects in my first year in college I was in a much better position to chose the subjects that I wanted to specialise in.

Choosing to specialise in business and sociology worked well for me; the business component gave me a marketable knowledge base and skill set, while the sociology component encouraged me to think critically and introduced me to research skills.

I wouldn't do anything differently. It was great to be in a course where the classes got smaller as I progressed through, so I got a lot of guidance as I stumbled forward!

Choosing a specialised degree wouldn't have been a good choice for me at the time - I'm still amazed when I think of my friends who knew exactly what they wanted to do as they left school.

The biggest thing I learnt through my degree was that I had developed a skill set that I could use in a variety of ways. Having a degree in a specific area doesn't limit you to that for life! 
  go to interview...
 
R&D Engineer - Liam McCaul
Liam McCaul, Sustainable Energy AuthorityPhysics, Chemistry and French. I also studied German in college. It is good to have another language regardless of what it is. Anything to do with Engineering, I would highly suggest Maths and Physics. 
  go to interview...
 
Clinical Nurse Manager 2 - Ejiro O'Hare Stratton
Ejiro O'Hare Stratton, Health Service ExecutiveEconomics, English, Maths, History, Biology, Art, BK, were the subjects I took. Biology stood to me for nursing but Economics and History also proved useful when I did my course in Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations. 
  go to interview...
 
Guidance Counsellor - Brian Howard
Brian Howard, Department of Education and Skills

For my Leaving Certificate I studied the three compulsory subjects: English, Irish and Maths. I had a great interest in science so I chose to do two science subjects - Biology and Chemistry. I wanted to keep as many options open as possible as I wasn't 100% sure what I wanted to do on leaving school so I chose one business subject - Economics and I chose a language - French, in order to keep all the universities open also.

In hindsight I think this was a good selection of subjects as it kept a lot of doors open while also allowing me to chose subjects I liked and did well in. I eventually went on to do a science degree so my 2 Leaving Certificate science subjects came in handy. Once I had my degree this allowed me to teach and subsequently do my postgraduate in Guidance Counselling.

 
  go to interview...
 
 

Course Overview header image

Less than 20% of Leaving Cert students take maths at higher level, with many students falling back to ordinary level when the pressure builds up in sixth year.

It is a relatively straightforward subject for those who are good at maths, but tends to be perceived as time-consuming. The introduction of bonus points for students securing a H6 or more on higher level maths has increased the take-up of the subject.

The roll-out of the revised syllabus through the Project Maths programme is likely to further increase take-up at higher level among students.


Course Contentheader image

Project Maths divides the course into five 'strands' of maths which are studied at all levels, and in greater depth at higher levels:

  • Statistics and Probability aims to provide an understanding of what probability is and why concepts such as variation and uncertainty are important. Students will also learn how to analyse statistics such as those in newspapers, business reports, and scientific data, so that they can draw meaningful and relevant conclusions. [http://alison.com/maths/]
  • Geometry and Trigonometry deals with shapes such as circles and triangles, both on the coordinate plane and otherwise. The skills developed here are useful in areas such as architecture, landscape design, and agriculture, as well as visual design and spatial reasoning.
  • Number Learners continue to make meaning of the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole and rational numbers and extend this sense-making to complex numbers.
  • Algebra builds on the relations-based approach of junior cycle, which has five main objectives:

- to make use of letter symbols for numeric quantities

- to emphasise relationship based algebra

- to connect graphical and symbolic representations of algebraic concepts

- to use real life problems as vehicles to motivate the use of algebra and algebraic thinking

- to use appropriate graphing technologies (graphing calculators, computer software) throughout the strand activities.


Exam Structure header image

Mathematics is available for study at three levels: Foundation; Ordinary; Higher.  Each level covers everything in the levels below it.

Aiming for Higher Level:

Mathematics at higher level is designed to suit the needs of all students, whether they are continuing their study of mathematics to third level, studying it as a compliment to another subject (such as Business or Physics), or just looking for points.

The higher-level course familiarises students with the ideas of abstraction and rigorous proof, giving learners a feel for the great mathematical concepts that span many centuries and cultures, as well as covering practical everyday topics which students are meeting in their lives outside school.

Higher level maths is considered the most time consuming subject of all and often requires more hours of study than other subjects to get a good result. The course is demanding, but very rewarding, both in terms of intellectual achievement and potential career paths opened. However, once you master the skills and concepts, the amount of memory work is minimal. Worldwide, and particularly in Ireland there is huge demand for students who are technically capable, and higher level mathematics trains students in the skills needed to succeed.

Aiming for Ordinary Level:

At ordinary level, students are offered mathematics that is meaningful, relatively accessible, and chosen with the understanding that many of them may go on to use and apply mathematics in their future careers, and all of them will meet the subject to a greater or lesser degree in their daily lives.

The course starts with practical and familiar problems, and gradually introduces more abstract ideas, leading towards the use of academic mathematics in the context of further study.

Most Leaving Cert students sit the ordinary level maths exam, often dropping down from higher level having become more aware of their lelvel of ability and  perhaps due to increased pressure in sixth year. 

Tip: The most important thing is to consider is how much time you are spending on higher maths. If you are spending too much time and but are capable of a H6 grade, you have the benefit of gaining 25 aditional bonus points. On the other hand, if you are unlikely to achieve this grade, maybe the time could be better spent on other subjects you are stronger in. 

Aiming for Foundation Level:

At foundation level, maths is about developing a body of knowledge and skills that make sense, and can be used in many different ways as good method of solving problems and finding answers. It is intended to equip learners with the knowledge and skills required in everyday life. It is also intended to lay the groundwork for learners who may proceed to further studies in areas in which specialist mathematics is not required.

The course focuses primarily on fundamental skills and providing a basic but solid understanding of mathematical concepts which will remain relevant and useful in the future. As well as numerical problems, students can also expect to be presented with visual and spatial questions, as well as some theory.

Tip: It is useful to be aware of the range of college courses that accept /do not accept Foundation Level Maths, and the impact for both CAO Points and College entry. From 2017, CAO points will be allocated by certain colleges and institutions only - universities will not award points for Foundation Maths, but most will accept it as meeting the entry requirement. A Grade F1 will be awarded 20 Points and Grade F2 is worth 12 Points. Other restrictions may apply - for example, the Defence Forces do not accept Foundation Maths for Cadetships in the Army, Air Corps or Navy.


Career Possibilities header image

Higher level: From a careers perspective, students considering opportunities in any area of science, medicine, engineering, business, or finance should study higher level maths if at all possible, as large portions of the higher level course will be reviewed or assumed at third level.

There are many other careers and courses which benefit from a knowledge of higher level maths including: accountancy, astronomy, clerical work, marketing, computers and banking.



Career Guidance