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Subject Choice for Leaving Cert...

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Design & Comm Graphics

Ed Zone

These courses enable learners to gain recognition for the achievement of considerable knowledge in a range of subject areas, as for example in the Leaving Certificate and one-year Post Leaving Certificate courses.

Courses may be academic or practical in focus, and awards that are recognised by the National Framework of Qualifications may lead to progression opportunities higher up in the framework.

Employment Opportunities
The majority of people with certificates at this level are well prepared for occupations that involve using their knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include office secretary, customer service representatives, special needs assistant, retail salespersons and childcare workers.

Level on the National Framework of Qualifications
2 Years
Duration of course
Grades Awarded

Marks Distribution 2018:
Listed below are the percentage distributions of marks from the 4445 students who sat the Higher Level Design & Comm Graphics exam in 2018.

Listed below are the percentage distributions of marks from the 1130 students who sat the Ordinary Level Design & Comm Graphics exam in 2018.

In brief... header image

This subject develops students' comprehension ability, and problem solving and creative thinking skills are developed through the analysis and solution of both 2 and 3-dimensional graphics. Graphics and design are communicated using freehand sketching skills, traditional draughting equipment and CAD.


Why Study this?header image

Why Study Design and Communications Graphics

  • DCG helps to further students’ cognitive and practical skills with modules like graphic communication, problem solving, spatial visualisation, design capabilities, computer graphics and much more.

What kind of student would DCG suit?

  • Students who have taken Tech Graphics to Junior Cert level.
  • Students who have a keen interest in further studies in practical areas of engineering and construction, or in apprenticeships which include the study of technical drawings.

Recommendations/Tips

  • It is an advantage to have studied Technical Graphics at Junior Cert. level.
  • Free-hand sketching is a main component of the core topics. Therefore, Junior Cert Art, Materials Technology or Wood Technology would serve as an advantage in this area.
  • A basic knowledge of ICT skills is also beneficial.
  • Students must also appreciate that work completed must conform to a high standard of neatness and draftsmanship.


Videos & Interviews header image


Read what others say about their Leaving Cert. Subject Choices...
Civil Engineer - Maria O'Neill
Maria O'Neill, Smart Futures

In hindsight, I am happy to say I wouldn't have done anything differently to date! In my Junior Cert I did 9 subjects ; Maths, Irish, English, History, Geography, Science, Business Studies, French and Tech Graphics. I liked Languages and history the least. I won't lie, Maths, Geography, and Tech Graphics were the ones I enjoyed the most.

When I was choosing for my leaving Cert I still hadn't decided what I would do when I was finished. I was thinking of Engineering, Teaching or Physiotherapy. I wanted to leave my options open. To do physio you need a language (to get in to UCD) and 2 science subjects. I decided to do Maths, Irish, English, French, Geography, Physics and Chemistry for my leaving. That left all the options open.

I was good at Business Studies, but after looking at courses in college, I discovered you don't usually need a business subject to get into a business course. This is not the case for Science based courses. In 6th year I took up Applied Maths. Since I was doing Physics and Maths I had a good background for the subject. Twenty classes and just homework, and I got an honour. If anyone was to ask me if they should do it, if you like maths, its a great subject!

 
  go to interview...
 
Farm Manager - Dry Stock - Kieran Magee
Kieran Magee, TeagascAll the subjects I choose had a practical aspect to them,e.g. Woodwork, Metalwork, Technical graphics and of course the usuals.  I suppose looking back on it I was always working with my hands and that's what I enjoyed.

The likes of Woodwork and Metalwork are skills which are used every day when out in the yard or down the back of a field fixing a broken machine. If I went back to pick better subjects I probably would have added Agricultural Science into the bunch, but other than that I'd stick with the same. 
  go to interview...
 
Ships Engineer - Brendan Cavanagh
Brendan Cavanagh, Bord Iascaigh MharaI had chosen physics, engineering and technical drawing which all helped when I went to train in BIM college 
  go to interview...
 
Environmental Officer - Marie O'Donovan
Marie O'Donovan, CRH plc

The most relelvant subjects to my college course  which I choose for my leaving certificate were physics & chemistry.

I also had honours maths which was essential along with one science subject for entry into my college course.

These three subjects have been a useful back up throughout my career so far.

I think I choose well,  the one thing I would change about my choices would be to do technical drawing.

 
  go to interview...
 
Amateur Astronomer - Deirdre Kelleghan
Deirdre Kelleghan, Smart FuturesWhen I was young, going on to third-level education was not something everyone did or could do – I had to go straight to work when I finished secondary school. This was difficult as I wanted to go to art college but could not. However, as I was working (in graphic design) I paid for myself to go to college at night and did a Diploma in Art in Industry and Commerce. To fulfill my needs I also did courses in life drawing at night in the National College of Art and Design which I totally loved. There is no hindsight worth pursuing, as what happened is in the past and I got on with my life in my own way, with my own drive.  
  go to interview...
 
Mechanical Engineer - Damien Mason
Damien Mason, CRH plc

The subjects which I had control of choosing and which influenced my career path were:

Secondary School: Technical Graphics, Construction Studies, Engineering, Physics. These were an excellent base for my degree course in Mechanical Engineering in University.

University: Mechanical Engineering - choose fluids stream instead of solids stream half way through my degree course. In my current career, choosing the fluids stream has not had any significant bearing on my ability to perform my job.

If I had the choice in Secondary School, I would have chosen Spanish as a language to study. This allows a lot of extra opportunities to travel globally.

If I had the opportunity to change my choices in University, I would have done a years post grad in buisness studies and accounting after my degree in mechanical engineering. I belive this would have given me a competitive advantage in aspiring to a career in management.

 
  go to interview...
 
Energy Manager - Jonathan Pugsley
Jonathan Pugsley, Sustainable Energy Authority

Science Subjects: Maths, Physics, Biology, Tech drawing, Chemistry  - I loved these and they are very applicable for my current career path.

Data analysis and problem solving - it's all about number crunching at the end of the day when working on technical problems.

Arts, English, English Literature and French are subjects I was never really interested in at school, but have become more interested in the last 10 years, as they are very useful for communication purposes, and that is now a very big part of my job.

 
  go to interview...
 
Consulting Engineer - Peter LaComber
Peter LaComber, CRH plc

I chose Physics, Chemistry and Technical Drawing as my optional subjects for the Leaving Certificate with a view to choosing an engineering course at third level.

These subjects certainly helped with first year in college as I had a foundation in those subjects to build on.

In hindsight, I would have chosen Applied Maths over Technical Drawing as the engineering course had a significant Applied Maths content.

Overall, I feel my subject choices were appropriate for my career choice.

 
  go to interview...
 
Woodturner - Glenn Lucas
Glenn Lucas, Design & Crafts Council of IrelandTech drawing. 
  go to interview...
 
Wind Engineer - Des Lalor
Des Lalor, Sustainable Energy AuthorityMaths, English, Irish, Physics, Tech Drawing, Geography, French  
  go to interview...
 
 

Course Overview header image

Design and Communication Graphics (DCG) has taken the place of technical drawing for the Leaving Certificate and provides students with the opportunity for visualising and comprehending information presented verbally or graphically.

If you are interested in taking this subject to Leaving Certificate level, you will need to have taken Tech Graphics to Junior Certificate level.

There is a great emphasis in the Leaving Certificate course on comprehension, analysis and problem solving. In simple terms, you must be able to understand what has to be done, analyse how you are going to approach it and then proceed to solve the problem.

Although it is not an essential subject for either architecture or engineering, it is regarded as a useful asset if you are thinking of a technical course. The DCG course now has a project aspect.

Quick Facts

Design and Communication Graphics is assessed by means of two assessment components: a student assignment at 40%, of which CAD forms a significant and compulsory element, and an examination paper at 60%.


Course Contentheader image

The course is comprised of two parts; Core areas of study and Optional Areas of Study

Part One – Core Areas of Study

Plane and Descriptive Geometry

  • Project Systems
  • Plane Geometry
  • Conic Sections
  • Descriptive Geometry of Lines and Planes
  • Intersection and Development of Surfaces

Communication of Design and Computer Graphics

  • Graphics in Design and Communication
  • Communication of Design
  • Freehand Drawing
  • Information and Communication Technologies

 

Part 2 – Optional Areas of Study

You will be required to study two of the optional areas listed below:

Applied Graphics

  • Dynamic Mechanism
  • Structural Forms
  • Geological Geometry
  • Surface Geometry
  • Assemblies


Exam Structure header image

One Terminal Exam Paper: 60%
Student Assignment: 40%

Terminal Exam: 3 hours duration.

 

Student Assignment Emphasis on: 

1.   Elements of design
2.   Communication graphics
3.   Use of ICT in design

Different theme for Higher and Ordinary level

May take the form of: 

-A design investigation and modification
-A concept design


Career Possibilities header image

DCG is a core element of many third level options including: Engineering, Product Design,  Construction and Architecture. Knowledge of this subject will greatly enhance a student's ability in any third level engineering-based programme.

Other relevant career areas include: toolmaker, engineering technician, and carpentry and aircraft technician.



Career Guidance