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Administrative?

Administrative

Administrative people are interested in work that offers security and a sense of being part of a larger process. They may be at their most productive under supervisors who give clear guidelines and while performing routine tasks in a methodical and reliable way.

They tend to enjoy clerical and most forms of office work, where they perform essential administrative duties. They often form the backbone of large and small organisations alike. They may enjoy being in charge of office filing systems, and using computers and other office equipment to keep things running smoothly. They usually like routine work hours and prefer comfortable indoor workplaces.

Subject Choice for Leaving Cert...

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Other Language

Ed Zone

These courses enable learners to gain recognition for the achievement of considerable knowledge in a range of subject areas, as for example in the Leaving Certificate and one-year Post Leaving Certificate courses.

Courses may be academic or practical in focus, and awards that are recognised by the National Framework of Qualifications may lead to progression opportunities higher up in the framework.

Employment Opportunities
The majority of people with certificates at this level are well prepared for occupations that involve using their knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include office secretary, customer service representatives, special needs assistant, retail salespersons and childcare workers.

Level on the National Framework of Qualifications
2 Years
Duration of course
Grades Awarded
In brief... header image

The State Examinations Commission provides examinations in a range of "non-curricular EU languages". These are languages which do not appear as part of the normal school curriculum, but students may opt to be examined in them, if they meet certain conditions, some of which are listed below. 

Recognised languages are: Latvian, Lithuanian, Romanian, Modern Greek, Finnish, Polish, Estonian, Slovakian, Slovenian, Swedish, Czech, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Portuguese, Danish and Dutch.

The following are conditions students must meet:

  • Speak the language natively
  • Be taking Leaving Certificate English
  • Be taking only one non-curricular EU language
  • Be from a member state of the European Union
  • Have followed a programme of study leading to the Leaving Certificate

Why Study this?header image

What kind of student would the Other Language option suit?

  • Students who can already speak the language and want easy points.
  • Students with a particular interest in a country's culture, history, and language.
  • Students who are considering working in a particular country or international relations in the future.

Recommendations/Tips

Check directly with your School, or with the Examination Section of the Department of Education and Skills.


Videos & Interviews header image

Magda Rogers - Polish

Hugh Cooney - Chinese


Read what others say about their Leaving Cert. Subject Choices...
Embassy of Japan in Ireland - Edel Carleton
Edel Carleton, Languages ConnectI loved languages in school, and continue to love them now, which I think has definitely been the biggest influence on my career. I went to an all Irish primary school, then began German in secondary school and took up Japanese in TY.  
  go to interview...
 
Lecturer - Dr. Patrick Cadwell
Dr. Patrick Cadwell, Languages ConnectStudying languages altered my career path the most - I studied French first and then Japanese, and these subjects led me to Luxembourg and Japan. 
  go to interview...
 
Care Assistant  - Deirdre Lavelle
Deirdre Lavelle, St. Michael's HouseIn school I studied English, Irish, Maths, History, and French. As I came to this line of work late in life experience and courses I have done since leaving school have been helpful to me.

I did the foundation in counseling skills course in Maynooth College, I feel this has helped me in my work as it developed my listening skills.

Also here I had my first introduction to non verbal communication and reading body language etc., which is very useful in my current job as I work with people who communicate largely by non verbal means.

If I could go back in time I would have worked harder in school and achieved a better leaving certificate, as I spent many years doing a job I was not suited to. 
  go to interview...
 
Guidance Counsellor - Brian Howard
Brian Howard, Department of Education and Skills

For my Leaving Certificate I studied the three compulsory subjects: English, Irish and Maths. I had a great interest in science so I chose to do two science subjects - Biology and Chemistry. I wanted to keep as many options open as possible as I wasn't 100% sure what I wanted to do on leaving school so I chose one business subject - Economics and I chose a language - French, in order to keep all the universities open also.

In hindsight I think this was a good selection of subjects as it kept a lot of doors open while also allowing me to chose subjects I liked and did well in. I eventually went on to do a science degree so my 2 Leaving Certificate science subjects came in handy. Once I had my degree this allowed me to teach and subsequently do my postgraduate in Guidance Counselling.

 
  go to interview...
 
Pharmacist - Rachel Berry
Rachel Berry, Health Service Executive

For GCSE I studied Maths, Additional Maths, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Geography, English Language and Literature and German.

For A-Level I took Maths, Chemistry and Biology. I chose these subjects primarily because I was good at them and also because I enjoyed them. The school I attended was very academic and I always knew my future career would involve science of some description so the choices I made were logical.

I do regret not continuing on with art, although at the time I wasn't sure I could spare the time to commit to an extra subject that wasn't really going to come in useful. I guess you just have to weigh up costs and benefits. I found it very helpful to have a good grasp of statistics and pure maths as these topics came up quite alot during the pharmacy degree.

If you are thinking of taking a degree in pharmacy make sure you look at the admission requirements in good time as they can be quite specific and I know the grades are increasing every year so you need to be sure you are capable of making the grades.

 
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Primary School Teacher - Brian Cadigan
Brian Cadigan, Department of Education and SkillsI needed to chose a second language besides Gaeilge in order to get into St. Patrick's College in Drumcondra. I decided to study French. 
  go to interview...
 
Occupational Therapist - Tomas Flanagan
Tomas Flanagan, St. Michael's House

In school we had to choose our Leaving Cert subjects just before the Junior Cert. At this stage I had no idea what I wanted to do as a profession but I knew I wanted to go to College.

In order to keep my options open I chose a mix of subjects to include one language, one science subject and one business subject. In addition to the obligatory English, Irish & Maths I therefore studied French, Biology, Geography & Accounting. I chose these particular subjects as I had an interest in them at Junior Cert level.

I suppose Biology was the most relevant of my subjects when I started college as there was some overlap with Anatomy and Physiology. We also studied research and statistics in college which were Maths related.

 
  go to interview...
 
Psychologist - Clinical - Elaine MacDonald
Elaine MacDonald, St. Michael's House

I like the way that the Irish school system allows students to study a variety of subjects to get a broad base.

I chose a range of subjects including languages (French and Spanish) which allowed me to make friends and really immerse myself in different cultures during my summers abroad.

I feel that Maths helped me to develop my logical mind, and prepared me well for learning to use statistics which are widely used in Clinical Psychology.

Biology was certainly useful to take in school and is relevant to Clinical Psychology because of its focus on how the human body works and how the brain functions.

English was also useful to the role of Clinical Psychologist as report writing skills are used across the board, and good ability to express yourself both verbally and in writing is very important.

I also feel that my involvement in school sports (hockey and swimming) was important in helping me develop into a person who enjoys being part of a team.

 
  go to interview...
 
Restaurant Manager - James Sheridan
James Sheridan, Careers Portal

I did business studies and accounting for my leaving cert which was an advantage in college but not essential. A language would have been helpful too.  I didn't do a language so I couldn't go straight into to a degree level course. I always wanted to go to college, but couldn't make a decision -  its hard when your only 17 to make choices. 

I decided to do a two year Failte Ireland Course, this was perfect as it was a blend of practical and theory. This also gave me the right platform to go on to the degree level course in Hotel and Restaurant Management.  As I already had two years done I  jumped into the 2nd Year, which I have just finished.

 I also had four months off where I went travelling, working on south beach Miami as a bartender.

 
  go to interview...
 
Catering Sales Executive  - Lisa Curry
Lisa Curry, Careers PortalAs well as the standard leaving certificate subjects I chose History, Business, Home Economics and German. I have always had an interest in history and this is rearing its head once again now that I am in Powerscourt.

The Business Subjects are very important too as they were a vital foundation subject for my college degree. I have a strong aptitude for finance and hope to go on to complete the ACCA exams one day.

I also studied German from the age of 12 through to degree level. Although I am not fluent I have a reasonably good understanding of the language and feel that having an extra language is always beneficial (i.e. in a previous job we had a number of German tour buses visiting the hotel and I often had to speak to the guests in their own language). 
  go to interview...
 
 

Course Overview header image

Each language will have different requirements, please check with the State Examinations Commission here.


Course Contentheader image

Each language will have different requirements, please check with the State Examinations Commission here.


Exam Structure header image

Check directly with your School or with the Examination Section of the Department of Education and Skills.


Career Possibilities header image

Studying any language is a great foundation for the study of other languages leading to careers in the European Union, Translating, Interpreting, Sales, Marketing, Tourism and Hospitality, and Teaching.



Career Guidance