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What are your interests?

Linguistic?

Linguistic

The Linguistic's interests are usually focused on ideas and information exchange. They tend to like reading a lot, and enjoy discussion about what has been said. Some will want to write about their own ideas and may follow a path towards journalism, story writing or editing. Others will develop skills in other languages, perhaps finding work as a translator or interpreter. Most Linguistic types will enjoy the opportunity to teach or instruct people in a topic they are interested in.

Subject Choice for Leaving Cert...

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Other Language

Ed Zone

These courses enable learners to gain recognition for the achievement of considerable knowledge in a range of subject areas, as for example in the Leaving Certificate and one-year Post Leaving Certificate courses.

Courses may be academic or practical in focus, and awards that are recognised by the National Framework of Qualifications may lead to progression opportunities higher up in the framework.

Employment Opportunities
The majority of people with certificates at this level are well prepared for occupations that involve using their knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include office secretary, customer service representatives, special needs assistant, retail salespersons and childcare workers.

Level on the National Framework of Qualifications
2 Years
Duration of course
Grades Awarded
In brief... header image

The State Examinations Commission provides examinations in a range of "non-curricular EU languages". These are languages which do not appear as part of the normal school curriculum, but students may opt to be examined in them, if they meet certain conditions, some of which are listed below. 

Recognised languages are: Latvian, Lithuanian, Romanian, Modern Greek, Finnish, Polish, Estonian, Slovakian, Slovenian, Swedish, Czech, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Portuguese, Danish and Dutch.

The following are conditions students must meet:

  • Speak the language natively
  • Be taking Leaving Certificate English
  • Be taking only one non-curricular EU language
  • Be from a member state of the European Union
  • Have followed a programme of study leading to the Leaving Certificate

Why Study this?header image

What kind of student would the Other Language option suit?

  • Students who can already speak the language and want easy points.
  • Students with a particular interest in a country's culture, history, and language.
  • Students who are considering working in a particular country or international relations in the future.

Recommendations/Tips

Check directly with your School, or with the Examination Section of the Department of Education and Skills.


Videos & Interviews header image

Magda Rogers - Polish

Hugh Cooney - Chinese


Read what others say about their Leaving Cert. Subject Choices...
Civil Engineer - Maria O'Neill
Maria O'Neill, Smart Futures

In hindsight, I am happy to say I wouldn't have done anything differently to date! In my Junior Cert I did 9 subjects ; Maths, Irish, English, History, Geography, Science, Business Studies, French and Tech Graphics. I liked Languages and history the least. I won't lie, Maths, Geography, and Tech Graphics were the ones I enjoyed the most.

When I was choosing for my leaving Cert I still hadn't decided what I would do when I was finished. I was thinking of Engineering, Teaching or Physiotherapy. I wanted to leave my options open. To do physio you need a language (to get in to UCD) and 2 science subjects. I decided to do Maths, Irish, English, French, Geography, Physics and Chemistry for my leaving. That left all the options open.

I was good at Business Studies, but after looking at courses in college, I discovered you don't usually need a business subject to get into a business course. This is not the case for Science based courses. In 6th year I took up Applied Maths. Since I was doing Physics and Maths I had a good background for the subject. Twenty classes and just homework, and I got an honour. If anyone was to ask me if they should do it, if you like maths, its a great subject!

 
  go to interview...
 
Electronic Engineer - Shane Callanan
Shane Callanan, Smart FuturesWhen in I was in school I didn’t really have a definite career plan. However I did prefer the Science subjects in general over languages or Business type subjects. Along with the obligatory subjects, I continued with Physics, Chemistry and Honours Maths for my leaving certificate, not so much as a conscious career choice but because I liked them. However as it turned out these all helped me during my course, and they tied in with my career choice. 
  go to interview...
 
Lecturer - Dr. Patrick Cadwell
Dr. Patrick Cadwell, Languages ConnectStudying languages altered my career path the most - I studied French first and then Japanese, and these subjects led me to Luxembourg and Japan. 
  go to interview...
 
Chef - Fiona Uyema
Fiona Uyema, Languages ConnectStudying French was useful for me to study Japanese in college. However I didn't like French in school as I don't believe it is taught in a fun way for students. It's mostly based around learning things off with no enjoyment around the language itself or the culture. 
  go to interview...
 
Garda - Nan Hu
Nan Hu , An Garda Sí­ochánaI studied Tourism, Management and Language in college. Because I like to help people I think it was very beneficial that the subjects I took provided me with the necessary knowledge to communicate with people and to deal with the general public. 
  go to interview...
 
Opera Singer - Sharon Carty
Sharon Carty, Languages ConnectMy advice if you're uncertain about choosing subjects is to choose things you're interested in, rather than what you think will be good for your career. A broad education will serve you really well not only in terms of college options, but also can enrich your life outside of school and work. I have a huge interest in astronomy and loved studying physics in school, and although I'd never have had the talent in Maths to study it at 3rd level or have a career in it, it meant I can really enjoy reading popular science books and keep up with what's going on in space exploration, as a hobby. For Leaving Certificate I studied English, Irish, Maths, Physics, Music, Biology, German and Classical Studies. Looking back, the subjects I did (specifically English, Music, Classics and German) meant that I was well-equipped with a lot of background knowledge that was helpful in my career as a singer, in terms of literature, language and musical training. Without having studied Music at 2nd level, with the wonderful teacher I had, I am 100% certain I wouldn't be a singer today. 
  go to interview...
 
Restaurant Manager - James Sheridan
James Sheridan, Careers Portal

I did business studies and accounting for my leaving cert which was an advantage in college but not essential. A language would have been helpful too.  I didn't do a language so I couldn't go straight into to a degree level course. I always wanted to go to college, but couldn't make a decision -  its hard when your only 17 to make choices. 

I decided to do a two year Failte Ireland Course, this was perfect as it was a blend of practical and theory. This also gave me the right platform to go on to the degree level course in Hotel and Restaurant Management.  As I already had two years done I  jumped into the 2nd Year, which I have just finished.

 I also had four months off where I went travelling, working on south beach Miami as a bartender.

 
  go to interview...
 
R&D Engineer - Liam McCaul
Liam McCaul, Sustainable Energy AuthorityPhysics, Chemistry and French. I also studied German in college. It is good to have another language regardless of what it is. Anything to do with Engineering, I would highly suggest Maths and Physics. 
  go to interview...
 
Department of Foreign Affairs - Shane Sargeant
Shane Sargeant, Languages ConnectI am very glad I studied French and Spanish at Leaving Certificate level. I think it is very important to develop language skills as early as possible. 
  go to interview...
 
Psychologist - Clinical - Elaine MacDonald
Elaine MacDonald, St. Michael's House

I like the way that the Irish school system allows students to study a variety of subjects to get a broad base.

I chose a range of subjects including languages (French and Spanish) which allowed me to make friends and really immerse myself in different cultures during my summers abroad.

I feel that Maths helped me to develop my logical mind, and prepared me well for learning to use statistics which are widely used in Clinical Psychology.

Biology was certainly useful to take in school and is relevant to Clinical Psychology because of its focus on how the human body works and how the brain functions.

English was also useful to the role of Clinical Psychologist as report writing skills are used across the board, and good ability to express yourself both verbally and in writing is very important.

I also feel that my involvement in school sports (hockey and swimming) was important in helping me develop into a person who enjoys being part of a team.

 
  go to interview...
 
 

Course Overview header image

Each language will have different requirements, please check with the State Examinations Commission here.


Course Contentheader image

Each language will have different requirements, please check with the State Examinations Commission here.


Exam Structure header image

Check directly with your School or with the Examination Section of the Department of Education and Skills.


Career Possibilities header image

Studying any language is a great foundation for the study of other languages leading to careers in the European Union, Translating, Interpreting, Sales, Marketing, Tourism and Hospitality, and Teaching.



Career Guidance