Featured Advice
What are your interests?

Linguistic?

Linguistic

The Linguistic's interests are usually focused on ideas and information exchange. They tend to like reading a lot, and enjoy discussion about what has been said. Some will want to write about their own ideas and may follow a path towards journalism, story writing or editing. Others will develop skills in other languages, perhaps finding work as a translator or interpreter. Most Linguistic types will enjoy the opportunity to teach or instruct people in a topic they are interested in.

Exploring Career Options

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Exploring Career Options

Most schools running the TY programme allocate some time to careers.

One of the most valuable career activities is doing Work Experience - it's an excellent opportunity to find out what it's like to work in the real world, and decide whether you like (or hate) it!

Other popular activities include Career Projects, running a Mini Enterprise, completing a Career Investigation and going to a Careers Fair.

Each school organises their own unique TY programme and we encourage you to make the most of the time available.

Career Sectors

A great place to start your exploration of careers is to browse through our pages on Career Sectors. Career Sectors are like families of jobs that relate to a particular activity - like medicine or construction. Knowing a bit about the sector you are interested in can help you to narrow down your focus to a particular type of career.

In each of the Career Sectors, we discuss what types of jobs there are, and list courses that provide qualifications for these industries and related jobs.

Explore Career Sectors


Top 5 things to do to find out about Careers

No. 1

Let's think about it. The best way to find out about being a paramedic, for example, is to be one - something which is not very realistic for a TY student. So what's next best thing? Probably working alongside one during their day-to-day activities - you would then get a good idea of what they do, the pressures they face and their working environment. This you can do - its called work experience. This is top of the to-do list if you want to really find out about a particular job.

Go to Work Experience


No. 2

Obviously you can also get a good idea from watching TV and films - these can be quite graphic and convey some of the reality of the job. But, apart from documentaries, they tend to show a glossed up or exaggerated version of reality, not the real thing. Still, you can get a sense of a career from movies and TV programmes. It's quite likely that most of what you know about many jobs is from TV or films - which also means that unfortunately, you may have an inaccurate picture of the reality of these careers.

Watching videos of people talking about their career is more realistic than information from the TV and movies, with the exception of some documentaries. You get to hear directly from workers who are telling their story for the purpose of informing people what the career is like. This is number two on our list, and there are over 200 career videos on this site, and links to hundreds more from within our occupational database.

Watch Career Videos


No. 3

You could of course talk to someone who is a paramedic (or whatever career you are interested in). Ask them what its like. This is called an Interview and can be very useful if you can find someone to talk to in a career you are interested in. If you get the opportunity to talk to someone, be sure to have your questions prepared in advance. There are some things you might forget about, or you may get carried away by some of the details and not remember to ask about something important - like what sort of qualifications you might need!

We recommend you use whatever contacts you have to interview or talk to someone in a career you are interested in - your parents and relatives, your friends, their parents and relatives, your teachers etc etc. Most people will be very happy to tell you about what they do for a living and give you their advice - so don't be shy!

Read Career Interviews


No. 4

For some occupations you may not be able to access any of the above (work experience, career videos or career interviews). The next thing to try is searching Occupations in a database. These are specially designed collections of important information about hundreds of occupations. They will describe in detail what the job is like, and what level of education or experience may be required.

We recommend you search the database on this site (click on A-Z Occupations via the link below). The best way to search is by putting the name of the occupation in the search box, or by choosing one of the categories we provide. Oddly enough, using the A-Z list often misses out - as the title you are thinking of may be called something else in our database!

Our occupational database also links to jobs advertised online at the moment, so you can see what kind of real jobs are being advertised right now - along with the specific requirements asked for. We also link to several international occupational databases to give you a broader view of the job positions available, and to hundreds of career videos related to the job.

Search Occupational Database


No. 5

Even if you get a good understanding of a particular occupation from some of the above sources, it's also a good idea to ask your parents / relatives / friends what they know. Older people tend to know a lot about many of the traditional occupations and may have really useful information to share with you.

When it comes to more modern occupations, however, they may be completly clueless. Not surprising really, given that new jobs are being created almost daily to deal with the enormous changes that technology brings. We'll do our best to keep our database as up-to-date as possible to help you keep up with the times!





The main things that shaped my career were the subjects I took in school which lent themselves to this career. Obviously doing a B.Ed. in college also lent itself to teaching as a career.

Being a native Irish speaker shaped the path my career would take within teaching as 99% of my teaching career has been spent either in all Irish schools or Gaeltacht schools.


Hint: Department of Education and Skills

Who said this? Find out here: go