Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Mark Maguire from Construction Industry Federation to give some advice for people considering this job:

Mark Maguire

Apprentice Electrician

Construction Industry Federation

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Mark	Maguire
The advice I would give is firstly talk to someone you may know that is already in the trade and ask them any questions that you may have or ask them about some of there first hand experiences.

Another good piece of advice would be to go onto YouTube and search some basic electrics, keep in mind that these are the kind of things that you will face when you go to the college phases of your apprenticeship . There are books and e-books that can be purchased to get an understanding.
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Investigative?
Investigative
The Investigative person will usually find a particular area of science to be of interest. They are inclined toward intellectual and analytical activities and enjoy observation and theory. They may prefer thought to action, and enjoy the challenge of solving problems with clever technology. They will often follow the latest developments in their chosen field, and prefer mentally stimulating environments.
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Growing your Skills

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Growing your Skills

The focus on activities in TY offers a great chance to develop the sort of life skills that really matter as you grow older.

Skills are learnt by doing - this means they develop over time while actively doing something. You can't learn lifeskills from a book, no more than you can learn to drive a car by just reading about it.

So, a number of TY modules usually involve activities with your classmates, where you have to work together as a group, sharing out different tasks and responsibilities, and discussing how things should be done. Through these activities you have the opportunity to develop what are known as 'soft' skills - those skills that enable people to get along together and produce good work efficiently.

These 'soft' skills are also known as career skills for the same reason - they are the skills that are needed by all people in the workplace in order for them to do their job well. We encourage you to explore what these skills are during your TY in general, and in your work experience in particular.

Fact: you can get all A's in your Leaving cert or college degree, but if you are not able to communicate well, or work comfortably in a team, you won't get the job.

Employers regard career skills as equally important to qualifications - so developing career skills is actually incredibly important for your future career.

Explore Career Skills here




Well in secondary school the subjects I choose to study definitely did make it easier when I was deciding on what career path to take once I had finished school. Studying construction studies for 5 years in school made me realise I wanted to work in the construction industry.


Hint: ESB

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