Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Paul Dowling from Teagasc to give some advice for people considering this job:

 

Paul Dowling

Horticulturist

Teagasc

Read more

  Paul Dowling
Ideally, try and get a job in the industry for a summer, or get a bit of experience before you go into it. You have to be happy with working outside, and doing physical work. If you are not prepared to work hard or are looking for a soft job, don't go into Landscaping. Design is very sexy at the moment, everyone wants to be a designer, a Landscape Designer. It's different on the ground, you have to be out there on sites in all weather and you have to make sure projects are managed well and you're able to muck in with everyone else. Biology is most important for anyone going into Horticulture or Landscaping as it covers propagation and helps with the identification of plant names, species and families through the universal use of Latin. Chemistry is also helpful as the use of various chemicals is a constant in horticulture. The chemical content and dangers of fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides in use in Amenity Horticulture needs to be understood anyone going into this business. Geography would be a relevant subject as well. Also, the simple things like having a full, clean driving licence, which can make you a lot more employable if you are trying for a job with a Landscape Conractor. This indicates that you are more mobile and can also drive a company van if needed. Be sure you're happy with the outdoor life. Having taken a Horticulture course will give you an advantage. However, it's possible to take a job first and study later, e.g. in IT Blanchardstown it is possible to study at night. I think you cannot beat doing the Diploma Course in the National Botanic Gardens because it is a good practical course which also covers all the theory and is invaluable for gaining plant knowledge.
Close

Realist?
Realist 
Realists are usually interested in 'things' - such as buildings, mechanics, equipment, tools, electronics etc. Their primary focus is dealing with these - as in building, fixing, operating or designing them. Involvement in these areas leads to high manual skills, or a fine aptitude for practical design - as found in the various forms of engineering.

Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
All Courses
PLC Progression Routes
PLC Points Calculator
CAO Points Calculator
CAO Video Guide

Galway-Mayo IT - GMIT 
Liberties College 
Pearse College of Further Education 
Career Interviews
Sector Profiles
School Subjects (LC)
College Courses
Close
Study Skills
Other
Work Experience (School)
CV & Interview Preparation

Smart Futures - Career Videos

<
Back
Smart Futures 

Smart Futures


News and Alerts...
Interviews & Videos
Planetary Scientist
Caitriona Jackman

Caitriona Jackman
Analytical Chemist
Brian O'Connor

Brian O'Connor
Software Engineer
Karl Stanley

Karl Stanley
Design Engineer
Sinead Kenny

Sinead Kenny
Electronic Engineer
Shane Callanan

Shane Callanan
Physicist
Dr Arlene O'Neill

Dr Arlene O'Neill
Amateur Astronomer
Deirdre Kelleghan

Deirdre Kelleghan
Astronomer
Dave McDonald

Dave McDonald
Mechatronic Engineer
Elva Bannon

Elva Bannon
Science Teacher
Cian O'Mahony

Cian O'Mahony
Science Communicator
Brian Macken

Brian Macken
Science Communicator
James Stewart

James Stewart
Contact Details

Caitriona Jackman, Planetary Scientist

Caitriona Jackman went to secondary school at Crescent College Comprehensive in Limerick. From there, she did a degree in Applied Physics at the University of Limerick. During that time she did a 9-month co-op placement at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory in Surrey.  After graduation she moved to the University of Leicester to do a PhD in Planetary Science. She is now working as a postdoctoral researcher at Imperial College London.

We Asked about...
Current Job?
What are the main tasks and responsibilities?
Describe a typical day?
What are the main challenges?
What particular skills do you bring to your workplace?
What's cool?
What's not so cool?
How did you go about getting your current job?
Career Development?
Education and Training?
Personal Qualities?
Advice for Others?
Related Occupational Information: