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Paul Galvan

Resource Teacher

Department of Education and Skills

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Paul Galvan
I would advise them to ensure they enjoy working with young people. If possible try to get some teaching experience; I started out as a substitute teacher before applying for my H Dip in Education.
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Organisation Profile - Construction Industry Federation

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Construction Industry Federation 

Construction Industry Federation


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Career Articles

Interviews & Videos
Site Manager - Grad Entry
Aidan Maher

Aidan Maher
Apprentice Electrician
Mark Maguire

Mark	Maguire
Tremco Illbruck
Sara Phillips

Sara Phillips
Apprentice Painter Decorator
Fergal Feehely

Fergal Feehely
Plumber / Construction Super.
Donal Kane

Donal Kane
Site Manager - Trade Entry
Colin Butterly

Colin	Butterly
Apprentice Carpenter
Oisin Murphy

Oisin	Murphy
Bricklayer
Brian Conville

Brian	Conville
Wallis Construction
Louise Martin

Louise Martin
Mercury Engineering
Joanne Bradley

Joanne Bradley
Electrician / Quantity Surveyor
Eileen Faherty

Eileen Faherty
Collen Construction
Lisa Roche

Lisa Roche
Designer Group
Larissa Tardelli

Larissa Tardelli
Contact Details


 

Building the Future – Now!

The construction industry is a dynamic, diverse and challenging industry. The industry needs energetic problem solvers to deliver a vast array of projects – could you be part of it?

Building the Future – Now!

The construction industry is a dynamic, diverse and challenging industry. The industry needs energetic problem solvers to deliver a vast array of projects – could you be part of it?

Career Opportunities... header image
What are the main occupations in this sector?


Because the industry is so varied and diverse, there is a vast array of career opportunities across the construction sector.

Depending on your aptitude and abilities, there is an opportunity to work in a dynamic growing sector and in an environment that both challenges and rewards.

The main Apprentice-based occupations and Craftworker categories in this sector are:  

 Electrician; Plumber; Carpenter & Joiner;  Stone mason;  Bricklayer;  Pipefitter;  Painter and Decorator;  Tiler; Sheet metal worker etc. - more details on the SOLAS website.

Professionals in the sector include:

There are also Operative-level occupations: 

Machinery operators
Skilled General Operatives
Technical General Operatives

 

What types of employment contracts are there?


In general, most people working in the construction industry work directly for companies. That being said, many people once they gain experience and abilities, start their own businesses and therefore become self-employed and indeed employ others.

 

What are the typical earnings of these occupations?


Graduates can expect to earn between €30,000  - €35,000. Salaries move up quickly and a graduate can expect salaries to rise by up to 25% in the first 12 – 18 months.

Crafts/trades and apprentices can expect to earn the following rates;

HOURLY RATES REGISTERED AGREEMENT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY


RATES OF PAY

Category 1 Worker                                                            €17.04 per hour
General Operatives with more than one year’s experience working in the sector

Category 2 Worker                                                            €18.36 per hour
Skilled General Operatives:
Scaffolders who hold an Advanced Scaffolding Card and who have four years’ experience Banksmen, steel fixers, crane drivers and heavy machine operators

Craft Worker                                                                      €18.93 per hour
Bricklayers/stone layers, carpenters and joiners, floor layers, glaziers, Painters, plasterers, stone cutters, wood machinists, slaters and tilers 


New Entrant                                                                       €13.77 per hour
General operatives who are over the age of 18 years and entering the Sector for the first time. 


Apprentices
1st year 33.3% of craft rate
2nd year 50% of craft rate
3rd year 75% of craft rate
4th year 90% of craft rate

OVERTIME

Monday – Friday from normal finishing time to midnight time plus a half Midnight to normal starting time double time

Weekends first four hours from normal starting time On Saturday morning time plus a half All subsequent hours worked double time.

 

How do you get a job in this sector?


Apprenticeships:

CIF  provide an online platform for young people considering the opportunities available in the construction sector www.apprentices.ie 

For the first time in Ireland, people seeking apprenticeships in construction, and employers seeking to recruit apprentices, have a central place to meet. The website provides information for those interested in the construction sector on how to develop a career in the sector. It allows you to create an account and upload a profile, outlining why you think you should be considered for an apprentice position. The quality of the information uploaded could result in an interview with a potential employer.

In order to secure an apprenticeship, applicants need to find an employer who will take on an apprentice and is approved to do so by SOLAS. Employers may also advertise in the media for such positions.

General Construction Job Vacancies:

Jobs are advertised in a variety of media such as college recruitment drives, business sections of the national newspapers, local media, trade magazines, recruitment websites, college/second level career guidance counsellors etc.

People may also get jobs from contacting those already employed in the industry and by contacting construction companies directly.

CIF also advertise positions - see www.cifjobs.ie   

 


Education and Training... header image
What qualifications are required?


Entry into the construction sector is possible at all levels. General operatives join the industry with no experience but through working with others and on various projects, they gain skills informally.

Traineeeships: General Operative (GO) trainee programmes are now available through Education and Training Boards (ETB's) around the country.  For example colleges such as Ballyfermot Training Centre now offer short courses in areas such as Steel Fixing, Form Work, Flooring and GO training.  Courses in other ETB's include Glazing and Roofing.  These traineeships could be up to 18 months in duration.

http://www.ballyfermottrainingcentre.ie/?search=1&view=0

To check out all the ETB's around the country see link below.

http://www.etbi.ie/etbs/directory-of-etbs/

Semi-skilled operatives will recieve training "on the job" and through training programmes i.e. Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) - which trains operatives to deliver specific skills such as machine driving (excavators / dumpers etc).

Apprentices must meet minumum entry requirements set down by SOLAS (minimum of 5 grade D in the Junior certificate) - POTENTIAL APPLICANTS TO ELECTRICAL TRADE BE WARNED! - MOST EMPLOYERS IN THIS SECTOR WILL ONLY ACCEPT APPRENTICES WHO HAVE COMPLETED THEIR LEAVING CERTIFICATE AND A MINIMUM OF PASS MATHS AND PREFERABLY INCLUDING PHYSICS.

School leavers wishing to qualify as engineers / surveyors should check with their chosen college to ascertain the entry requirements. New entrants to the construction sector arrive from a variety of backgrounds and have a range of prior formal qualifications, such as Leaving Certificate or equivalent.

Degrees in all disciplines are welcomed for those wishing to work in the construction sector. There is always a requirement for highly skilled graduates. Many of those working in the sector will have come from a range of academic backgrounds such as:

  • Finance
  • IT
  • Engineering
  • Architecture
  • Social sciences
  • Business studies
  • Accounting etc.

Life long learning is an important aspect to continuing progression within the sector.

All workers in the industry must have completed Safe Pass.

 

What are the typical routes into this sector?


New entrants arrive in the sector from various educational and training routes. The most traditional entry routes would be from schools or colleges.

Students may also pursue apprenticeships which involve a combination of working with a company and studying in a third level institution.

Traineeships are also available from ETB's around the country, these couses can be up to 18 months in duration and cover many areas such as steel fixing, welding, roofing, flooring, glazing and general operative (GO).

 


Advice... header image
What advice do you have for school leavers?


If you are interested in working in the industry, make use of your Transition Year and look for work experience. Approach local companies to seek their assistance to achieve this or ask your career guidance counsellor what contacts they may have in the industry.  CIF have launched a new Transition Year Work Placement Initiative in 2018 which allows students search for work placement opportunities on line and once a placement is secured they can carry out a structured placement with construction employers across the country.

The industry recognises that is is competing with other industries in vying for the best talent. So, we have launched this initiative to show transition year students that the industry is very safe, it provides a secure career path and increasing salaries; and is increasingly diverse. We need to show young people that there are many, very modern and innovative roles on offer. This initiative will enable companies to give Transition Year (TY) students a chance to experience construction in the very best way by exploring their interest.

For health and safety reasons, all workers in the industry must have completed Safe Pass - a one day safety awareness programme - if you already have this completed, that will make it easier for an employer to give you some work experience.

Speak to those you may know in the industry to get some guidance from them and knowledge of their experiences.

Understand what your aptitudes are - work will generally be outdoors and involve a lot of probelm solving , managing complex issues and dealing with people .

 

What advice do you have for graduates?


As the industry recovers it is clear that there is a shortage of graduates becoming available. Remember that the sector is growing and is expected to create 60,000 jobs in the coming 5 years. Now is the time to get a qualification and be prepared to join a rising industry with a need for skilled professionals.

 

What advice do you have for career changers?


The construction sector offers scope for entrants at all levels, and with various levels of previous experience. Within the industry there are opportunities to move from on-site to off-site work and across trades.

 

What advice do you have for non-Irish nationals?


There are opportunities for people with formal qualifications and a large number of professional qualifications which can be gained while working in the industry. 

Traineeships are now available throughout the country through the Educational and Training Boards (ETB's).  These course can last up to 18 months and cover areas such as welding, roofing, glazing, flooring, steel fixing and general operatives (GO).

 

What advice do you have for those wishing to go back to work?


Opportunities exist for those wishing to become self-employed. In addition, some smaller companies are seeking part-time workers which may suit those looking for more flexible working arrangements.

Traineeships are now available throughout the country through the Educational and Training Boards (ETB's).  These course can last up to 18 months and cover areas such as welding, roofing, glazing, flooring, steel fixing and general operatives (GO).

 


Meet our People...
""The industry doesn't care about your gender. I don't think they care if you're a woman or a man.""
Wallis Construction
Louise Martin
"If you like meeting new people and taking charge of situations then this is a good role for you"
Site Manager - Grad Entry
Aidan Maher
""I think women can shape the future of the industry by being involved, being opinionated and letting their opinions be heard"."
Collen Construction
Lisa Roche
"There is constant recognition of your work and how safely you have done it while you are on the job and that is very rewarding."
Apprentice Electrician
Mark Maguire
""The thing is that you have different options in the industry.""
Designer Group
Larissa Tardelli
"You get great satisfaction at the end of the week when you see all the planning and the work co-ordinated well to present a new piece of construction"
Site Manager - Trade Entry
Colin Butterly
"Be open to any advice and teaching that will help you learn your craft."
Apprentice Carpenter
Oisin Murphy
""A lot of the women that start out as electricians are offered opportunities to go into other elements of the company.""
Mercury Engineering
Joanne Bradley
""You will find LGBTI people throughout the construction industry. You can build a successful career and a rewarding career within the industry.""
Tremco Illbruck
Sara Phillips
"If you work hard and produce excellent quality work you will never be quiet. "
Apprentice Painter Decorator
Fergal Feehely
"When I started the apprenticeship I thought you would be a plumber and thats it but there is so much diversity and opportunity within the trade."
Plumber / Construction Super.
Donal Kane
"I asked my father if women could be electricians and his response was ‘women can be anything they want to be these days.’"
Electrician / Quantity Surveyor
Eileen Faherty
Bricklayer
Brian Conville

Employer Insights... header image
Getting the job...
Main challenges...
Typical day...
Further training...
Advice if considering this job...
The lifestyle...
Whats cool...
Not so cool...

Global Opportunities... header image
Are there overseas opportunities available?

The skills gained within the industry are extremely transferable and experience of large building and infrastructure projects are welcomed by employers in other countries.

Many Irish construction companies have operations abroad and there are opportunities to work overseas with these organisations.

Also, as mentioned above, qualifications and experience in the construction sector are mobile and many working in the sector will have worked predominantly in the UK, USA, Canada and Australia.

In more recent times, many Irish copmpanies have secured contracts in the Middle East, particularly in the mechanical and electrical industry.

As the global construction industry grows by 50% up to 2030, working in any role within an Irish construction company gives you skills that can act as a passport to work in ay country.  Increasingly, our employees, who are building for Facebook, Amazon, Google and other global companies, are being recruited to work in other countries.

 

Are there opportunities in this sector for non-Irish nationals?

A large number of non-Irish nationals have found work at all levels of the construction industry in the past and are progressing through the career ladder within the industry.

 


About this Sector... header image
Please give an overview of your sector?


Building the future 

As the economy improves construction graduates and craftspeople are in big demand. This sector is on the rise again in Ireland so it is the perfect time to be considering a career in the industry.

The construction industry has hired an additional 50,000 people since the recovery began in 2013. The ESRI estimates that the industry is at 50% of the level considered essential to the Irish economy. 

The AECOM Annual Review 2018 estimates the value of construction output across the Republic of Ireland (ROI) in 2017 at €17.1 billion. According to DKM Economic Consultants 2016 Demand for Skills report and Aecom’s 2018 forecast, the industry is set to grow by between 9 – 14% this year. 

https://aecomtls.azurewebsites.net/annualreview/AECOM_REVIEW_2018.pdf

There are now 150,000 people working in construction in Ireland. This figure grew by 18% in 2017 and the forecast for 2018 is a further growth of 14%.  What’s more, that number will rise over the coming years. The Government is targeting the creation of an extra 60,000 construction jobs by 2020 which will create many opportunities for people looking to begin their career in this area.

What other sectors will provide so many possibilities for those who are completing their education? A growing industry always creates more jobs and no sector will grow as quickly in Ireland as construction is estimated to over the next few years.

Construction professionals work in a range of specialist services as well as three broad areas: 

  • Civil
  • Building 
  • Mechanical and Electrical 

Civils deals with larger infrastructure projects like roads and flood defences, while professionals working on the building side of the industry will be involved in projects such as shopping centres and industrial units.

As the demand grows for the construction of residential properties and the completion of such projects, an increase in skilled professionals will be required.

The mechanical and electrical sector, as the name suggests, is a specialist area dealing with the ‘fit-out’ of a building including heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and electrical works. This is an important sector for the Irish economy as capability in this area means Ireland can attract major international companies such as Intel with full confidence that we have the skills to build and maintain their high tech installations.

The nature of construction work means it’s a varied and challenging career. People who study construction related subjects in college move on to work for some of Ireland’s best-known construction firms.

Aoibhin Gaynor is one such graduate: “I have a First class honours degree in Mechanical and Manufacturing engineering BAI and a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in Mathematics BA from Trinity College Dublin (TCD).”

“I am currently employed as a mechanical engineer with the Jones Engineering Group. At present, I am working on one of the largest Building Information Modelling (BIM) projects in Europe at the Intel campus in Leixlip, Co Kildare. As a team lead my day-to-day activities involve managing a group of 3D Virtual Construction Designers in preparing 3D models using several Autodesk software packages."

“The greatest benefit of a degree in engineering is it offers a wide range of career possibilities and provides you with a set of skills highly adaptable to many sectors. Choosing to study mechanical and manufacturing engineering was the first major milestone in my career development. The thing I love most about engineering is that it enables you to work as part of a diverse, collaborative team of professionals and teaches you how to communicate complex ideas. Projects are always changing and developing - particularly as the technology and area of expertise develop. Engineering involves creativity, innovation and allows you to work on interesting projects, with the opportunity to travel.”

CIF President Dominic Doheny says: “What I love about the construction industry is how no two days are ever the same. Each day brings a new challenge and new possibilities. I don’t think I would have had the same prospects in any other sector.”

 

What is the size and scope of the sector?


The Irish construction industry employs approx 150,000 people directly (2017 figures). This figure grew by 18% in 2017 and the forecast for 2018 is a further growth of 14%.

A further 40% are employed in industries which serve the construction sector, such as architectural practices, engineering consultancies and legal and financial sectors and agencies.

The AECOM Annual Review 2018 estimates the value of construction output across the Republic of Ireland (ROI) in 2017 at €17.1 billion, it forecasts a 14 per cent increase to €19.5 billion in 2018. This activity is spread between civil engineering, commemercial construction as well as a rising residential market.

 

What are the current issues affecting this sector?


The construction industry is thriving once again and levels of recruitment are increasing as activity grows the overall Irish economy improves.

The National Development Plan annoucement in 2018 promised an investment of €115 billion in the country's infrastructure over the next ten years.

It will be backed by Exchequer funding to the tune of €90bn and a further €25bn will come from commercial State-owned enterprises.

There are 150,000 people employed in construction, with this figure expected to rise to 213,000 by 2020.

According to a DKM report commissioned by the CIF, construction activity can sustain an additional 112,000 Irish construction jobs up to 2020. This figure is based on an estimated €17.8billion worth of projects in the pipeline in 2017.

Key positions that need to be filled between now and 2020 are:

  • 15,200 electricians
  • 7,800 bricklayers
  • 11,800 plumbers
  • 30,800 carpenters and joiners
  • 13,900 plasterers/floorers and tilers
  • 9,400 painters and decorators
  • 9,600 managers
  • 18,100 operatives and
  • 27,600 general labourers

Government has published a policy document entitled "Construction 2020 - A Strategy for a Renewed Construction Sector" which outlines how the industry will be developed out to the year 2020.

A number of key Government strategies aim to shape the Ireland of 2027. The success of these strategies are largely dependent on the construction industry's capacity over the coming decade.:

  • NDP 115 Billion Investment in Infrastructure over next 10 years (2018)
  • 47,000 new social homes by the end of 2021
  • 80,000 new FDI related jobs by 2019
  • Target of 25,000 houses per year
  • 75,000 construction jobs by 2020 ЬĄ32bn in infrastructure by 2021
  • Low carbon economy by 2050

In order to meet this planned growth, the industry needs skilled professionals and crafts people to manage and deliver high quality projects.

As take up of construction related courses reduced during the recession, demand will be more acute going forward and there will be greater demand for those who decide to train to work in the industry.

 

What changes are anticipated over the next 5 years


Under the Government's plan for the construction industry (Construction 2020 - A Strategy for a Renewed Construction Sector), employment in the construction industry will grow by 60,000 in the next 5 years.  

The National Development Plan annoucement in 2018 promised an investment of €115 billion in the country's infrastructure over the next ten years.

It will be backed by Exchequer funding to the tune of €90bn and a further €25bn will come from commercial State-owned enterprises.

Some of the construction projects to benefit will include a second runway at Dublin Airport, the building of the M20 motorway to connect Cork and Limerick and the expansion of the DART.

There will also be investment in regional airports and school buildings across the country.

Priorities in health include the building of a new National Children's Hospital and a National Maternity Hospital.

This is to meet the demand of a recovering economy and to ensure that infrastructure is in place to allow economic growth and to meet the demands of foreign direct investment. 

The need for 90,000 more homes over the next seven years is indicated, which translates to 12,500 additional houses per annum up to 2021.

There will also be a significant demand for commercial property in the years ahead. There is evidence of increased demand for engineers and other construction specialists and there is also a shortage of available and suitable candidates as recruitment by main building contractors, civil & structural consultancies and architectural firms is beginning to pick up.

With this planned increase in employment, comes opportunities for individuals who have the foresight to see this growing demand and to consider studying construction related courses.

 

 

Do you have any statistics relevant to the sector?


The severity of the construction recession saw the numbers working in construction decline by almost 180,000 by Q1 2013 to just 35 per cent of the numbers employed at the peak (2007).

However, construction recorded the fastest rate of employment growth in the period since, gaining 39,200 jobs by Q2 2016.

There were now 150,000 persons directly employed in construction. This figure grew by 18% in 2017 and the forecast for 2018 is a further growth of 14%. 

 

 

 

Are there any areas in your sector currently experiencing skills shortages?


The key areas that require personnel are - Engineering (all disciplines), Project and Construction Management, Surveying (all disciplines), Quality, Environment and Health and Safety Managers as well as all the trades covered by the Apprenticeships (see below).

Apprenticeships are critical in ensuring that the high level of construction skills and the quality of the skilled construction workforce is maintained.

Apprenticeships are available in the following trades: 

  • Electrical
  • Plumbing
  • Electrical Instrumentation
  • Carpentry and Joinery
  • Plastering
  • Painting & Decorating
  • Skilled machinery operators

Taking up an apprenticeship means that you will alternate between site based work training and college over a period of four years to become a qualified crafts person.

An added benefit is that during all this time while you are training, you will be paid - even during the time you spend in college.

It takes time to acquire these skills and it is important that the level of apprenticeships within the construction sector is maintained in order to ensure that the industry retains competitiveness and effectiveness.

There will also be a significant requirement for new technical training courses for construction sector workers. This will ensure that the construction workforce is highly skilled, mobile and able to adapt to the changing economic conditions whilst ensuring that output isn’t affected.

According to a DKM report commissioned by the CIF, construction activity can sustain an additional 112,000 Irish construction jobs up to 2020. This figure is based on an estimated €17.8billion worth of projects in the pipeline in 2017.

Key positions that need to be filled between now and 2020 are:

  • 15,200 electricians
  • 7,800 bricklayers
  • 11,800 plumbers
  • 30,800 carpenters and joiners
  • 13,900 plasterers/floorers and tilers
  • 9,400 painters and decorators
  • 9,600 managers
  • 18,100 operatives and
  • 27,600 general labourers

 


About Us... header image

The Construction Industry Federation (CIF), is the national and regional representative body for construction industry employers (contractors) in Ireland. 

The industry in 2016 employs 137,000 people directly and in 2015 had an overall output of €13 Billion. 



CIF is recognised by Government, client and professional bodies as the representative body and voice of the construction industry and represents the views and interests of contractors in the sector.

Key areas where CIF lobby on behalf of members include:

  • Public capital spending programmes
  • Procurement contracts, policies and procedures
  • Legislation impacting on the construction industry and construction employers
  • Taxation policy
  • Employment and Industrial relations issues.
  • Health, Safety, Environmental and Quality issues
  • Issues of concern to specific groups of members - e.g. specialist sub contractors

CIF is a members based organisation and policy decisions are made by these member companies, through an Executive Body (Board) of 34 representatives appointed by each Branch and Association. All interests, both sectorally and regionally are represented in its decision making processes.

To support the operation of the CIF and provide expert advice to the Federation’s Committees, Associations and Branches, the CIF has a dedicated team of Executives and support staff who have specialist knowledge in construction matters . Offices are located in Dublin, Cork and Galway.

The CIF's objective to to develop the construction industry in Ireland into a strong industrial sector, making a positive contribution to the development of the Irish economy by ensuring the delivery world class infrastructure, to attract inward investment and to ensure a highly skilled workforce is availble to meet this demand.

Graduates and craftspersons are employed directly by CIF members. 

CIF provide an online platform for young people considering the opportunities available in the construction sector through the apprenticeships route www.apprentices.ie 

For the first time in Ireland, people sking apprenticeships in construction and employers seeking to recruit apprentices have a central place to meet. The website provides information for those interested in the construction sector on how to develop a career in the sector. It allows you to create an account and upload a profile, outlining why you think you should be considered for an apprentice position. The quality of the information uploaded could result in an interview with a potential employer.