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Realists like to find practical solutions to problems using tools, technology and skilled work. Realists usually prefer to be active in their work environment, often do most of their work alone, and enjoy taking decisive action with a minimum amount of discussion and paperwork.
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Organisation Profile - ESERO Ireland

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ESERO Ireland 

ESERO Ireland


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System Architect
Daniel Vagg

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Rosa Doran

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Earth Observation Application Engineer
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The European Space Education Resource Office

The European Space Education Resource Office

Career Opportunities... header image
What are the main occupations in this sector?


Sector-specific occupations include:

  • Engineers (including mechanical, electronic, optoelectronics, software telecommunications)
  • Software developers,
  • Software quality,
  • Material scientists etc.

The Space Industry offers a wide variety of careers and opportunities.  You might be surprised at the variety of opportunities across maths, physics, chemistry, engineering and computing.

Read career stories directly from people working in the industry HERE

 

What types of employment contracts are there?


In Ireland, most workers are with small companies specialising in a particular area. These positions are almost all full time contracts.

 

What are the typical earnings of these occupations?


Space companies tend to reflect earnings like the companies in other technology sectors. There may be higher earnings for technologists in the areas where there is a current skill shortage.

 

How do you get a job in this sector?


Employment in the sector is typically in industry. Jobs are advertised across the range of media, but increasingly in the social media.

 


Education and Training... header image
What qualifications are required?


The Space Science and Technology sector typically employes people with primary degrees (NFQ Levels 7 or 8) and with a relatively high proportion of employees at postgraduate level (NFQ Levels 9 and 10).

Most of these degrees are in science and engineering related areas, but there is significant diversity in the subject specialisms. The broad scope of the sector covers disciplines including:
  • aerospace engineering;
  • physics;
  • communications engineering;
  • electrical engineering;
  • mathematics;
  • mechanical engineering;
  • product assurance engineering;
  • software engineering;
  • systems engineering;
  • oceanography;
  • geology;
  • biochemistry;
  • chemistry; and
  • microbiology

 

What are the typical routes into this sector?


Most employees in the space sector enter from college, generally having studied engineering or science. A space-related specialisation is often advantageous.

 


Advice... header image
What advice do you have for school leavers?


School leavers should think about continuing their education at third level, before considering a career in the space sector. The type of course will depend on their area of interest, but typically a science or engineering degree is desirable, most likely to postgraduate level. Several Irish universities offer degrees physics with astronomy or astrophysics, while there are also relevant courses available in aeronautical engineering.

 

What advice do you have for graduates?


Graduates of any of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) disciplines should examine opportunities in any of the current companies involved in the sector. It should be noted that a postgraduate award would also be highly benifical.

Students could also consider specialised courses, e.g. Masters in Space Science at the International Space University; internships at the European Space Agency; SpaceMaster (Joint European Master in Space Science and Technology) etc, to give them specific knowledge of the space sector.

 

What advice do you have for career changers?


As the sector is so new, and much of the work is very specialised, there may be limited opportunities for career changers. There are requirements for highly specialised engineering and scientific employees specifically in highly specialised technology disciplines related to the space programme development, including electronics, optoelectronics, materials and structures.

Also, there may be opportunities for those with expertise in Management and Legal areas as the sector grows.

 

What advice do you have for non-Irish nationals?


The Space sector is highly international both in terms of markets and employment, and so nationality is not a factor.

 

What advice do you have for those wishing to go back to work?


There are requirements for highly specialised engineering and scientific employees specifically in highly specialised technology disciplines related to the space programme development, including electronics, optoelectronics, materials and structures.

Most employees in the space sector enter from college, generally having studied engineering or science. For those workers wanting to return to work and enter the Space sector, a space-related specialisation would be advantageous.

Several Irish universities offer degrees in physics with astronomy or astrophysics, while there are also relevant courses available in aeronautical engineering. Those wishing to go back to work could also consider specialised courses, e.g. Masters in Space Science at the International Space University; internships at the European Space Agency; SpaceMaster (Joint European Master in Space Science and Technology) etc, to give them specific knowledge of the space sector.

Nationality is not a determinant in recruitment or selection. The primary determinant is qualification relevant experience and specialism. The sector is highly international focus both in terms of markets and employment

 


Meet our People...
"The most important skill required in this line of work is flexibility"
Earth Observation Application Engineer
Gordon Campbell
"After I had my first physics class at school I knew it was the job for me"
Astronomy Educator
Rosa Doran
"Once you gain confidence in computer languages you can then adapt more easily to different concepts"
System Architect
Daniel Vagg

Global Opportunities... header image
Are there overseas opportunities available?

There is a high degree of international mobility of people working in the space sector. There are good global prospects for people with relevant space experience. As most European countries are involved with the European Space Agency, the opportunities to bring specialist expertise overseas is always a possibility.

 

Are there opportunities in this sector for non-Irish nationals?

Nationality is not an issue in the recruitment or selection process in this sector. The primary concerns are the qualifications and relevant experience in the area applying for. The sector is highly international focused both in terms of markets and employment.

 


About this Sector... header image
Please give an overview of your sector?


The “space” sector in Ireland is quite varied and includes companies from many areas of technology. These include aerospace, structures, electronics, optoelectronics, software and bio-diagnostics. Irish industry is involved in a range of space systems development such as space launch vehicles, satellites and human spaceflight. Irish companies are suppliers to the large space system integrators in Europe and other markets

Ireland has been a member of ESA since 1975 and participates in a range of ESA Programmes including;
  • Scientific Programmes
  • Earth Observation Programmes
  • Satellite Navigation Programmes (GALILEO)
  • Space Transportation Programmes (Ariane V)
  • Future Launchers programme (FLPP)
  • Satellite Communications Programme, (ARTES)
  • Space Science Experiments (PRODEX)
  • European Life and Physical Sciences Programme (ELIPS)
  • General Support Technology Programme (GSTP)

The industry addresses a range of markets in addition to the space market, for example, aerospace, telecommunications, and medical devices, etc.

Irish Space Capabilities
Irish companies have a track record in introducing highly innovative technologies to the space sector, in a range of technology domains including;

Space Segment

  • Propulsions subsystems (regulators, valves)
  • On board Software / Independent Software Validation
  • Passive Optical Components
  • Optics, Opto electronics
  • Hi Reliability Electronic Components
  • Advanced Composite Structures
  • Microwave components /Radiometers
  • Spaceflight avionics / Data acquisition and control Units
Ground / User Segment
  • Software development, Software tools
  • Telecommunications systems
  • Electronics / microelectronics
  • Advanced User Segment systems

Companies in the sector include indigenous companies including SMEs, Start ups as well as a number of FDI (Foreign Direct Investment) companies.

The sector tends to invest a high percentage of turnover in R&D (Research and Development). Over 60% of employees in this industry have primary or postgraduate degrees.

 

What is the size and scope of the sector?


Click to view full documentThe “space” sector in Ireland is quite diversified and includes companies from a range of technology domains including aerospace, structures, electronics, optoelectronics, and software.

The sector employs in excess of 1,000 at present and is projected to grow to over 1,600 employees by 2014. Employment opportunities relate to engineering and science graduates but also with opportunities in finance, marketing and business development.

The space industry in Ireland is currently demonstrating strong growth, despite the present economic circumstances.

 

What are the current issues affecting this sector?


The space programmes tend to be dominated by the Government programmes. The space sector is cyclical and appears to be approaching its peak cycle. However public investment in space systems is likely to be replaced by private investment so this cyclical pattern may change.

There are skill shortages in a number of highly specialised technology and scientific disciplines. These tend to be in areas of emerging and innovative technologies.

 

What changes are anticipated over the next 5 years


The sector is expected to grow steadily in Ireland over the next few years as the opportunities in the commercial space market continue to grow in Europe and the US. In addition to this, Irish companies continue to increase market share in the space business.

 

Do you have any statistics relevant to the sector?


The sector employs over 1,000 at present and it is estimated to grow to over 1,600 employees by 2014. Employment opportunities in this sector generally relate to engineering and science graduates, but there are also opportunities for graduates with degrees in finance, marketing and business development, etc.

 

Are there any areas in your sector currently experiencing skills shortages?


There are requirements for highly specialised engineering and scientific employees specifically in highly specialised technology disciplines related to the space programme development, including electronics, optoelectronics, materials and structures.

 


About Us... header image

Video: Irish Scientists in the European Space Agency

The European Space Education Resource Office (ESERO) Ireland promotes space as a theme to inspire and engage young people in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

Space is fascinating to people of all ages, it is all around us and inspires us in many different ways. Space is the ultimate cross-curricular theme cutting across history, geography, science, maths, literature, religion!

ESERO Ireland makes space themed resources accessible to teachers as a tool to engage their pupils. It also works to highlight the associated applications from space technology and raises awareness of the large range of career possibilities in the space domain.

ESERO Ireland is co-funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Discover Science and Engineering (DSE).

Careers in the Space Industry

The Space Industry offers a wide variety of careers and opportunities.  You might be surprised at the variety of opportunities across maths, physics, chemistry, engineering and computing.

Read career stories directly from people working in the industry HERE.