Featured Advice
What are your interests?

Enterprising?

Enterprising

Enterprising people like situations that involve using resources for personal or corporate economic gain. Such people may have an opportunistic frame of mind, and like commerce, trade and making deals. Some are drawn to sales and marketing occupations. Many will eventually end up owning their own business, or managing a section in larger organisations. They tend to be very goal-oriented, and work best when focused on a target. Some have an entrepreneurial inclination.

Forestry Careers Ireland

Grow your career in the forestry sector

Videos

UCD Forestry Degree -
UCD Forestry Degree -
Play
Forestry Education -
Forestry Education -
Play
Student Video - Forestry
Student Video - Forestry
Play

Interviews

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Adriene works as a lecturer on the Bachelor of Science in Forestry at Waterford Institute of Technology and also as a manager of Lismore Estate forest.

Ask me your
first question!

What were the main 'career decision' milestones in your life so far?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

I think my decision to stop working as a timber measurement contractor for Coillte and take up a position as manager with the Forestry Development Association Co-Op was the most important decision in terms of my career. I liked working with Coillte and I had an excellent mentor but the manager's position was an extremely interesting opportunity and I had to give it a try.

Who are the people who most influenced your career direction?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

I think my decision to stop working as a timber measurement contractor for Coillte and take up a position as manager with the Forestry Development Association Co-Op was the most important decision in terms of my career. I liked working with Coillte and I had an excellent mentor but the manager's position was an extremely interesting opportunity and I had to give it a try.

How did you go about getting your current job?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

I started my position as manager in Lismore Estate in 2003 after the retirement of the previous manager. I had to attend two interviews before I was offered the position in Lismore. In Waterford Institute of Technology, I started off doing part-time lecturing hours in 2003 and then was given a Contract of Indefinite Duration after I had been working for the college for a number of years.

Describe a typical day?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

During term time for WIT, I deliver lectures on the above subjects or prepare lecture plans, mark exams, attend meetings, organise and run field trips. In Lismore Estate I manage operations dependant on the time of year (establishment in the winter, harvest management in the spring and summer, management of maintenance operations, management of pesticide operations, staff training). I also measure timber, conduct inventory and survey the forest in general.

What are the main tasks and responsibilities?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Currently, I have two part-time positions: as a lecturer on the Bachelor of Science in Forestry at Waterford Institute of Technology and as manager of Lismore Estate forest. In WIT, I deliver lectures to forestry students in WIT on various modules including forest harvesting, sustainable forest management, forest engineering, forestry in the environment, forest economics, forest establishment and fundamentals of forestry. Also, I manage the forest resources for Lismore Estates including budgeting and financial management; harvest management, grant applications, health and safety, forest operations management, legislative requirements, personnel management.

What are the main challenges?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Juggling the workload between WIT and Lismore Estate can be a challenge.

What's cool?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Forestry! I love my work even though I fell into it almost by accident!

What's not so cool?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Work pressures when things are busy.

What particular skills do you bring to your workplace?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

I think I bring the practical experience I am continually gaining at Lismore Estate into my college work and the knowledge I learn from my colleagues and researching for lectures into my work for Lismore Estate.

What subjects did you take in school and how have these influenced your career path?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

I went to school in the UK in the 80’s taking English, Maths, Geography, History and Art and did not go back to education until I was a mature student in 1997.

What is your education to date?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

I have, and it is still my most treasured award, a National Diploma in Science in Forestry from Waterford Institute of Technology, which is now called the Bachelor of Science in Forestry. I also have a BSc (Hons.) in Forest Management, an MSc in Sustainability and Environmental Management, a Diploma in Environmental Impact Assessment and two Certificates in Renewable Energy Development.

What aspects of your education have proven most important for your job?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

My Diploma in Forestry and my BSc in Forest Management have been vital, although the other awards have proven useful at times.

What have been the most rewarding events in your career so far?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

The most rewarding events are definitely when I meet up with previous students who are now fellow forestry professionals and working in the industry.

What personal qualities do you have that helps you in your career?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Is luck a quality? And I suppose the potential to see when something has come my way and take the opportunity.

What is your dream job?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

I would have liked to study Landscape Architecture and be involved in forest design planning.

Does your job allow you to have a lifestyle you are happy with?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Yes, my job does provide a reasonable lifestyle for me and my family.

What advice would you give to someone considering this job?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

A willingness to continually learn, a level of humility (with all the required disciplines involved in forestry you need to be able to seek and take good advice), being personable (you will have to work with others and must be able to communicate and engender trust).

Have you undertaken, or do you plan to undertake any further training as part of your job?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Yes, I would still like to attend further courses. I think that a forester is always capable of learning something new because the field of interest for a forester is vast. A forester must have an understanding of economics, engineering, ecology, biology, chemistry, hydrology, silviculture, environmental science, and be knowledgeable in all the potential digital tools for use in forest management. And this is not even a complete list of the potential disciplines involved in forestry!

What kinds of work experience would provide a good background for this position?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Any kind of forestry or agricultural work, tree felling, planting, fencing, spraying, surveying as well as gaining academic qualifications and attending courses.

What is your current job title?

Adriene Booth, Forestry Lecturer

Forestry Lecturer in WIT & Forest Manager, Lismore Estate.

Ask a question about...
  • Career Development?
  • Current Job?
  • Education and Training?
  • Personal Qualities?
  • Advice for Others?
Mark Clery - Regional Forester
Mark Clery - Regional Forester
Read More
Tony Lenighan - Forester
Tony Lenighan - Forester
Read More
Niall O'Neill - Forest Manager
Niall O'Neill - Forest Manager
Read More
Stacey Bradley - Forest Resource Manager
Stacey Bradley - Forest Resource Manager
Read More