Careers rarely develop the way we plan them. Our career path often takes many twists and turns, with particular events, choices and people influencing our direction.

We asked Mary Joyce from Department of Education and Skills to give some advice for people considering this job:

Mary Joyce

Secondary School Teacher

Department of Education and Skills

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Mary Joyce
Teaching as they say is a vocation, it is a job that requires patience and enthusiasm. If you are considering teaching you need to look beyond the holidays and think of the 9-4 Monday to Friday spent dealing with children or teenagers and the challenges which they might pose.

I would advise anyone thinking of teaching as a career to speak with Teachers and learn of their experiences, both positive and negative. I personally would encourage people to consider teaching as it is an extremely rewarding profession in terms of the interaction you get daily with young people and the colleagues you meet in the job.
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Naturalist
Not surprisingly, some aspect of the natural sciences will run through the Naturalists interests - from ecological awareness to nutrition and health. People with an interest in horticulture, land usage and farming (including fish) are Naturalists.

Some Naturalists focus on animals rather than plants, and may enjoy working with, training, caring for, or simply herding them. Other Naturalists will prefer working with the end result of nature's produce - the food produced from plants and animals. Naturalists like solving problems with solutions that show some sensitivity to the environmental impact of what they do. They like to see practical results, and prefer action to talking and discussing.
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Related Career Sectors

Computers & ICT Computers & ICT
 

IT Professional Occupations

Key points for selected IT occupations

  • In 2016, there were approximately 67,000 persons employed in the selected IT occupations, representing 3.3% of national employment (Figure 9.3.1)
  • Almost four fifths of overall employment was concentrated in three sectors: just over a half in IT (mostly in computer programming and telecommunications), with an additional 15% in industry (mostly in computer, electronic and optical manufacturing) and 10% in financial, insurance and real estate
  • Three quarters of total employment was in professional level occupations (of which, two fifths were programmers and software developers); the remainder was at technician level
  • Between 2011 and 2016, total employment in IT occupations expanded by 5% on average annually ─ the second strongest average annual rate of growth amongst the 17 occupational groups examined; growth was observed for all occupations, with the strongest rates recorded for IT user support technicians (17.4% on average annually) and IT business analyst and system designers (8.8% on average annually) (Figure 9.3.2)
  • Over the same five-year period, a net 14,400 additional jobs were created; the largest employment increases (in absolute terms) were observed for programmers & software developers (6,600) and ICT user support technicians (4,300) 
  • Between 2015 and 2016, overall employment expanded by 13.9% with an additional 8,200 jobs; the change in employment varied significantly by occupation, from a 134.7% jump observed for web designers and developers to a 19% decrease for IT operations technicians
  • The majority of those employed in IT occupations were aged 25-54 years (Figure 9.3.3)
  • 92% of employed IT professionals had third level qualifications; the corresponding share was 76% for technicians (Figure 9.3.4)
  • Most of those employed in IT occupations were male and worked full-time; web designers and developers and ICT specialist and project managers had the highest share of females at 29% and 25% respectively
  • At 42%, employed programmers and software developers had over double the national average share of non-Irish nationals (15.4%); the share of non-Irish IT business analysts & systems designers was even higher at 44%.
  • In quarter 4 2016, the overall unemployment rate (15-74 year olds) for IT occupations was well below the national rate (2.9% compared to 6.7%), with both figures decreasing since quarter 4 2015.

Shortage Indicators

Almost a half of those employed in IT occupations were employed outside of the ICT sector, primarily in industry and financial activities. Employment in IT occupations is characterised by low replacement demand (the young age cohort means few are retiring and the occupations have a relatively low number of exits to study and home duties): these occupations also have a higher than average turnover rate, with movement between employers occurring more frequently than for professionals and associate professional occupations in general. While many IT occupations experienced little or no growth in recent years, employment growth was strong for programmers and software developers along with IT user support technicians.

The ICT sector accounted for approximately a quarter of all job announcements made in the media in 2016, with roles including IT security, data analytics, cloud computing, ecommerce (financial transactions/payments), telecommunications and Software as a Servic (SaaS), along with a significant number of roles in IT contact centres. In addition, a number of job announcements in the financial sector were for IT roles such as cyber security and data/business analytics.

While employment expanded by 8,200 for the selected IT occupations over a five-year period, there were over 11,000 recent job hires in 2016, two thirds of which were for professional roles. Those recently hired tended to have third level qualifications (80%) and young (55% were aged less than 35 years).

Over 2,700 employment permits were issued to IT workers from outside the EEA in 2016, accounting for over a third of all new permits issued; of those issued to IT workers, 2,300 were for professionals and the remainder for managers or technicians.

In 2016, there were more than 4,600 third level graduates (comprised of HEA and private/independent third level institutions); of these, more than two thirds were at levels 8-10. In the FET sector, apprenticeships in development include network engineer, software developer and fintech associate professional, all at NFQ level 6. Total ICT apprenticeship enrolment over the coming years is expected to be 280. In April 2017, there were 1,245 job ready job seekers with previous experience in IT professional or managerial roles; of these, a half held at least a degree (NFQ 7). A further 1,000 job seekers had previous experience in IT technician roles, a third of whom held third level qualifications.

Despite significant graduate supply and a number of job ready job seekers with IT skills (many of whom, given the comparatively high turnover estimates, are likely to be only in frictional unemployment), shortages of IT skills continue to exist. IT skills are in demand across all economic sectors. Furthermore, the situation is not unique to Ireland as there is a shortage of IT skills internationally.

Shortages of the following skills have been identified:

  • software developers: mobile (iOS/Android), database (with Oracle/SQL), web, cloud; with skills in Java, JavaScript, C++, .Net, PHP, CSS, F#, Python, and Ruby on Rails the most frequently mentioned
  • engineers: network (Linux, Open Source), database, QA, automated performance testers, DevOps (developing/testing, process re-engineering and communication skills)
  • systems/solutions architects, database architects: (e.g. data centres/data warehousing)
  • web design (niche areas only): particularly web related applications focusing on enhancing users’ online experience (UX) and supporting user interaction (UI) with 3-5 years’ experience
  • infoSec: (IT security), IoT (internet of things), cyber security analyst, data/information security, network security
  • business intelligence: BI solutions, big data analysts (e.g. Hadoop, Cassandra, SQL), ERP (enterprise resource planning) with SAP ▪ IT managers and business analysts (especially systems migration and IT project management e.g. waterfall and agile)
  • IT technicians: troubleshooting, tech support with languages, particularly German and database administrators.

Labour Market Research 24

These links are to well established sources of information used to review, evaluate and predict changes in our labour market.

Vacancy Overview 2016 - EGFSN 
Detailed analysis of labour market indicators, vacancy trends and difficult to fill vacancies from the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (May 2017)
Addressing the Demand for Skills in the Freight Transport, Distribution and Logistics Sector in Ireland 2015 2020 
February 2015 EGFSN report assessing the skills and competency requirements for the Freight Transport, Distribution and Logistics sector in Ireland up to 2020
Vacancy Overview 2014 - EFGSN 
The Vacancy Overview 2014 produced May 2015 by the Skills and Labour Market Research Unit in SOLAS on behalf of the EGFSN, draws on data from newly advertised job vacancies in the following sources: DSP Jobs Ireland and IrishJobs.ie. The analysis focuses
Monitoring Ireland's Skills Supply 
July 2015 report on those entering and leaving the Irish education system (primary, post-primary,further education and training, and higher education) spanning the ten levels of the National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ)
Regional Labour Markets Bulletin 2015 
Annual report produced by the EGFSN which identifies variations in skills supply and demand across 8 regions (Border, Dublin, Mid East, Mid-West, Midland, South East, South West and West).
Assessment of Future Skills Requirements in the Hospitality Sector in Ireland 2015-2020 
Report from the EGFSN assessing the skills demand within the Hospitality sector in Ireland to 2020 to ensure the right supply of skills to help drive domestic hospitality sector business and employment growth.
Vacancy Overview 2015 - EGFSN May 2016 
A report produced by the Skills and Labour Market Research Unit (SLMRU) in SOLAS for the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs contextualising 2015 vacancy data with what is occurring in the Irish labour market
Future Skills Needs of the Biopharma Industry in Ireland August 2016 
This report reviews the supply of, and demand for, skills within the Biopharma Industry in Ireland up to 2020, with a specific focus on Biologics manufacturing as a growing sub-sector within the industry. It is estimated that 8,400 potential job openings
Regional Labour Markets Bulletin October 2016 
A Report prepared by the Skills and Labour Market Research Unit in SOLAS.
Trends in Education and Training Outputs 
Monitoring Ireland's Skills Supply - A report by the Skills and Labour Market Research Unit (SLMRU) in SOLAS for the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs November 2016
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Current Labour Market Info 4

These sites provide news of current events that relate to our evolving labour market.

IBEC Quarterly Economic Trends 
Download publication in PDF format.
SCSI Employment Opportunities & Skills Requirements for Construction and Property Surveying 2014-18 
New report April 2014 from SCSI outlining the Employment Opportunities and Skills Requirements for Construction and Property Surveying projected from 2014-2018
Shortage of craft/entry level staff in the Hotel Sector 
Hotels and guesthouses are experiencing serious difficulties recruiting suitably qualified craft/entry level staff - IHF Annual Conference 24/2/14
National Skills Bulletin 2015 
The National Skills Bulletin 2015 provides an overview of the Irish labour market at occupational level, drawing on a variety of data sets, which have been systematically gathered in the National Skills Database (NSD) since 2003.


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